Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design at Tulane School of Architecture

Description

Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design at Tulane School of Architecture (formerly Tulane City Center) is nationally renowned for strategic partnerships with non-profit organizations in the Greater New Orleans community to advance high quality Public Interest Designs. Small Center's work is driven by citizen’s ideas and input and involves the faculty and students of the Tulane School of Architecture as well as many departments across Tulane University. The Small Center’s mission has been to educate, advocate and provide design services to New Orleans neighborhoods and non-profit clients who are traditionally severely under-resourced and underserved by the design disciplines. We continue to believe in the public necessity of design and its broad and popular access to all citizens. As a result the work is characterized by deep citizen engagement in the planning and design decisions that will affect their lives.

As the primary venue for outreach projects at the Tulane School of Architecture, the center enjoys a broad range of partnerships with numerous off-campus community-based and civic organizations. Each of these partnerships provides opportunities for faculty and students to engage real issues in real communities and participate in the life of our city.

The items in this collection document each collaborative project between Small Center and the local partner. Each project contains a booklet with designs, plans, drawings, and photographs. Supplemental materials (photographs, documents, videos) related to the projects are also included.

Pages

1725 Baronne Street
Small Center teamed up with Gulf Coast Housing Partnerships to realize this 7000 square foot permanent headquarters. The facility provides ample workspace for staff, students, fellows, and interns as Small Center expands, as well as community-based project studio space for courses such as the popular design-build studios. Most importantly, the new site helps to bring Small Center geographically closer to its project sites and partners as Small Center seeks to both strengthen existing relationships and forge new ones with community members, nonprofits and government agencies., baronne@tulane.edu
Adjudicated Properties Research
Small Center (then Tulane City Center) mapped the adjudicated properties in selected zones across New Orleans, and established a methodology for assisting the City of New Orleans with the mapping and documenting of adjudicated properties in six selected study areas across the city., baronne@tulane.edu
A.L. Davis Park: Visioning Study
A.L. Davis Park, formerly know as Shakespeare Park, is located at the corner of Washington Avenue and LaSalle Street in Central City, New Orleans. Directly across the street from the former Magnolia/ C.J. Peete Public Housing Development, the park holds extensive historical and cultural significance within the context of the neighborhood and the city, but in recent years has lost value as a community amenity due to the lack of funding, maintenance and an associated growth in violent crime., Tulane University: Howard-Tilton Memorial Library (http://library.tulane.edu/), baronne@tulane.edu
A.M.I.A.C.T. Allison Montana Institute Of Art, Culture And Tradition: Project Definition Report August 2010
The Allison Montana Institute of Art, Culture and Tradition (AMIACT) was established by Faces of Culture Inc. to document, educate, preserve, present and celebrate the unique cultural heritage and street performance traditions of people of color, native to the City of New Orleans. In preparation of the creation of A.M.I.A.C.T's physical site, as envisioned by "Faces of Culture," Small Center (then Tulane City Center) conducted research on a proposed site along North Claiborne Avenue, on its larger context - the neigborhood of Tremé, and on the street-based groups that are to become the focus of the new Institute. The report seeks to bring into focus the broad vision of the founders of the Institute., baronne@tulane.edu
Backstreet Cultural Museum: Renovation And Addition Proposal
The Backstreet Cultural Museum features a permanent collection of Mardi Gras Indian suits, parade costumes, photographs, and artifacts. The museum holds the largest collection of Mardi Gras Indian suits, which are gaining recognition for their aesthetic importance and artistic power. Small Center (then Tulane City Center) worked with the Backstreet Cultural Museum to reenvision a renovation of the space., baronne@tulane.edu
Bayou Road Initiative
In 2013, Small Center engaged with the local business community along Bayou Road on a number of design initiatives aimed at celebrating the culture and history of the commercial corridor and preparing residents and business owners for city-led streetscape and facade-improvement programs., baronne@tulane.edu
Can't Let it Go: Neighborhood Change and the Candlelight Lounge in Historic Tremé
Cornerstones is a place documentary initiative that teamed up with Small Center (then Tulane City Center) on various outreach projects throughout New Orleans. The project both documents and promotes sites that store, facilitate, or perpetuate New Orleans's history, culture, and sense of place. Tulane City Center and Cornerstones were asked by community members of the Candlelight Lounge in the Historic Term neighborhood to document and position the significance of the barroom within the neighborhood and New Orleans, so that efforts to sustain the barroom could be well supported., baronne@tulane.edu
Circle Food Store: Visioning Document
From its roots as the St. Bernard Market, Circle Food Store had served as a community hub for generations before flooding in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Small Center (then Tulane City Center) worked with local business owner, Dwayne Boudreaux, to develop tools to advocate for renewed investment in the historic 7th ward grocery., baronne@tulane.edu
City Park Campgrounds: A Visioning Document
The Campgrounds aim to accommodate a variety of users and events, with a goal of providing access for a diverse group of users. A combination of consistent use and special events could generate enough revenue to be an asset to City Park and New Orleans, while subsidizing certain events as a means of expanding accessibility., baronne@tulane.edu
City Park Skate Park: Tulane City Center Project Report, 2009
Like much of New Orleans, City Park, one of the nation's largest and oldest urban parks, must undergo extensive redevelopment after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. The park's new Master Plan 2018 identifies and outlines many opportunities to rebuild and redefine the existing park landscape. Looking towards the future, City Park planners have recognized the need to add fresh program to the park that will attract a new generation of users. In order to embrace new cultures, City Park has allotted a strategic zone of the park for a new skating facility for use by both skateboarders and park goers in general. This step towards embracing new user groups, encouraging diversity and growth manifest the park's mission to preserve and improve park spaces for recreational, cultural and beautification purposes., baronne@tulane.edu
Columbus Greenway Initiative
The Columbus Greenway Initiative (CGI) is a project led by a diverse coalition of 7th Ward residents and organizations including the New Orleans Food and Farm Network and the Neighborhood Story Project. This partnership has demonstrated how neighbors can come together to create vibrant and high functioning green space in a neighborhood where the city does not provide adequate space., baronne@tulane.edu
Community Book Center Interior Design-Build
In Spring 2016, a class of fourteen students worked with the staff and clients of Community Book Center to create a space that reflects Community Books' identity as an African-American-centered educational home., baronne@tulane.edu
The Cost of Home: Local Models + National Policy For Affordability
The Cost of Home exhibit worked to demystify the landscape of affordable housing by visualizing the programs, policies, and design politics that have shaped and continue to shape New Orleans and the nation, while expanding understanding of public intervention in the market and the role of policy in shaping outcomes. Through case studies, the exhibit contextualized the limited range of current models of design and program to providing housing for low to moderate income residents in New Orleans while proposing underutilized alternatives., baronne@tulane.edu
Covenant Farms: Urban Farming In Downtown New Orleans
While the New Orleans Covenant House shares common values with national partners, the organization has developed a set of site-specific strategies for youth training. White Dove Landscaping and the Covenant Café teach students real-world job skills under a proven social entrepreneurship model. Covenant Farms will build upon these two existing job training programs, linking landscape to kitchen through food production. Although real goods and services come out of these three initiatives, the primary focus of each program is on youth development., baronne@tulane.edu
CSED Center for Sustainable Engagement + Development Environmental Learning + Research Center
In an effort to create education and awareness of the importance of the coastal wetlands, CSED created an Environmental Learning and Research Center. This center serves as a gathering place for students, residents, and visitors to learn further about protecting the surrounding natural environment. Phase 1 of the center was completed in the spring of 2015 and provides an outdoor classroom, rain garden, and orchard., baronne@tulane.edu
Cultural Corridor On Lasalle Street Central City, New Orleans
The Lasalle Corridor is richly layered with historic places and events, from the Antebellum to the Civil Rights Era, it has reflected and helped to define the African American experience in New Orleans. The narratives of LaSalle are those of reconstruction and Jim Crow, the challenges of the civil rights movement in the Deep South, the promise and the limitations of public housing and the Great Society. Central City, through which LaSalle winds, was settled in the 1830's, back of town from the Garden District, bounded by the St. Charles street car line and undrained swamp. In the last decades of the 19th and first decades of the 20th centuries, Central City became home to New Orleans first Black hospital, first Black library and in Shakspeare Park, the first Black public park. These landmarks served to stretch the horizons of segregation, while simultaneously demarcating its boundaries. In a location and for a people that could have been defined by those limitations, there was instead a flowering of entrepreneurial activity, community activism, and culture., baronne@tulane.edu
Cultural Corridor On Lasalle Street, Central City, New Orleans
The Lasalle Corridor is richly layered with historic places and events, from the Antebellum to the Civil Rights Era, it has reflected and helped to define the African American experience in New Orleans. The narratives of LaSalle are those of reconstruction and Jim Crow, the challenges of the civil rights movement in the Deep South, the promise and the limitations of public housing and the Great Society. Central City, through which LaSalle winds, was settled in the 1830's, back of town from the Garden District, bounded by the St. Charles street car line and undrained swamp. In the last decades of the 19th and first decades of the 20th centuries, Central City became home to New Orleans first Black hospital, first Black library and in Shakspeare Park, the first Black public park. These landmarks served to stretch the horizons of segregation, while simultaneously demarcating its boundaries. In a location and for a people that could have been defined by those limitations, there was instead a flowering of entrepreneurial activity, community activism, and culture., baronne@tulane.edu
The Dew Drop Inn
Today there is renewed interest in the revitalization of the historic LaSalle corridor. The Dew Drop Inn complex represents a focal point of that vision and has great potential to bring live music and other main street commercial activity back to LaSalle, thus contributing to the larger revitalization of the corridor and neighborhood as a whole., baronne@tulane.edu
Envisioning New Futures: New Orleans Mission
Small Center (then Tulane City Center) worked with the New Orleans Mission on a small visioning packet that articulates the Mission's current activities and properties, and their plans for expansion in the near future., baronne@tulane.edu
Euterpe Bike Project Visioning Document
Euterpe Bike Project (EBP) is a social entrepreneurship endeavor focused on youth skills development in bike design, bike repair and customization, and marketing and small enterprise management. Located at 1825 Euterpe St. one block off of the historic Oretha Castle Haley Corridor, EBP is one of the several properties being developed as the City of New Orleans pushes to bring life back to a once vibrant cultural corridor., baronne@tulane.edu

Pages

Bookmark

Bookmarks: