French Colonial, Spanish Colonial, and Nineteenth-Century Louisiana Documents

Description

Louisiana documents from 1655 to 1924 with a strong emphasis on the French colonial, Spanish colonial, and early national periods. Includes correspondence, land sales, slave sales, plantation journals, business licenses, property sales, professional and family papers, legal documents, land grants, tax receipts, theater programs, broadsides, engravings, and more. A noted Louisiana document collector, Felix Kuntz (1890-1971) donated his collection to Tulane University in four installments beginning in 1954 and requested that it be named after his parents. Today, the Rosemond E. and Emile Kuntz Collection (LaRC Manuscripts Collection 600) is a renowned resource for studying Louisiana with a special emphasis on New Orleans. Particularly noteworthy are records from the Company of the Indies, papers of Francisco Bouligny describing early French and Spanish authority over Louisiana, documents spanning Louisiana's entry into the United States through the Civil War and New Orleans? growth as a major commercial center, New Orleans municipal records (1805-1850s, including an 1805 census), and several small personal and family collections such as those of John McDonogh, the Pontalba family, and the Pierson family.

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The White League in Louisiana
Mission of Crescent City White League; Political issues they encounter, larc@tulane.edu
Will and testament of Father Marcel Borella, parish priest of the Church of Saint Martin, Saint Martinville
Father Borella, a native of Sardinia, appointed the Bishop of New Orleans as the universal heir of all the goods he possessed in the United States and asked that the value of these be used to build and furnish a church in Saint Martin Parish. For memorial masses to be celebrated in his name, Father Borella set aside the sum of 1,000 piastres. He bequeathed legacies to his godson François Marcel Dumatrait and to "ma negresse Magdelaine." Lastly, he appointed A. Dumartrait as his executor. A note on the copy indicates that Father Borella died on 1836 January 21., larc@tulane.edu
Will and testament of J[ea]n P[ier]re F[ranço]is Bruno Aubrÿ, New Orleans
[This document was enclosed in a notarial act and cover of the same date (q.v.).] Jean Pierre François (or, as given in the document, Juan Pedro Francisco) Bruno Aubrÿ, a native of Rouen but now a resident of New Orleans, the legitimate son of Pedro Francisco Aubrÿ and Genobeba Lorrat, stated that the present document as his will and testament. He declared that nineteen months prior he had married Elizabeth Roche, widow of Juan Lafite. From the union Aubrÿ and his wife had a son Carlos, age six months, but his wife also had a child by a previous marriage, a son named Juan Enrique Lafite, six years old. His wife brought property worth 600 pesos to the marriage. The couple owned a house on Royal Street. Aubrÿ claimed he owed no money except that represented by two promissory notes, one for 5,000 pesos in favor of Nicolas Lobe, and another for 2,000 pesos in favor of his father-in-law Enrique Roche. He appointed Miguel Fortier as his testamentary executor. Finally, he named his son Carlos Aubrÿ as his sole heir. [A translation with commentary appeared in the New Orleans States, 1933 March 5. The writer claimed that Aubrÿ's stepson, Juan Enrique Lafite, and the pirate Jean Lafitte were one and the same person.], larc@tulane.edu
Will and testament of Maria Olivares, widow of Joseph Galvez, New Orleans
The widow Galvez declared that she was born in the Canary Islands, the legitimate daughter of Andres Hernandez and Josefa Olivares. She was a resident of Barataria, where she owned land and some sixty head of cattle. Her chattels included two slaves, a male and female, and the latter was to be freed after the death of Mrs. Galvez. She appointed as the executors and universal heirs of her estate Maria Dauberville, widow Bouligny, and Luis Bouligny., larc@tulane.edu
Woodcutting contract between L.F. DeGruy and the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company, New Orleans
The New Orleans Canal and Banking Company granted DeGruy the privilege of cutting up to 500 cords of firewood from the company land, situated on the south side of the New Canal and extending from Metairie Ridge to the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. DeGruy was not to cut live oaks, cypresses, or other timber trees, but he could cut willows, maples, and ashes. He would pay the company two dollars for each cord of firewood cut and six dollars for every thousand hoop poles cut., larc@tulane.edu
 Business letter from J.F. and J. Palmer, Vicksburg, to Major W.A. Ware, [near Clinton, Mississippi],
J.F. & J. Palmer wrote Major Ware about his order for bagging and rope, which they could deliver at Clinton the next day. The firm quoted prices for different grades of bagging and rope and acknowledged receipt of twelve bales of Ware's cotton., larc@tulane.edu
 Record of children born to slaves R[ansom] J. Causey, [Mississippi?]
This tiny booklet contains birth dates and names of slave children born from 1839 June 30 to 1862 September 16. The first entry, however, is a notation of a loan of $400 made by R.J. Causey to John Thompson on 1839 February 7. The last entry is a recipe for making berry syrup., larc@tulane.edu
 Records of the Artists' Association of New Orleans, Committee on Finance and Construction, 1885 October 22-1887 November 9.
[The Artists' Association was founded in 1885 by some of the prominent painters of New Orleans for the purpose of fostering the arts in the city. In conjunction with this goal the organization opened a school of art with several instructors, among them Julius R. Hoening. The function of the committee was to select and buy equipment and art supplies, to handle personnel, and to vote on applications for free tuition. Members of the Committee were Paul Poincy, Andrés Molinary, Theodore S. Moise, Bror Anders Wikström, and Achille Perelli.] The volume contains minutes of meetings, accounts, and lists of free pupils. The loose items consist of supply and requisition lists and receipts., larc@tulane.edu
 Sale of slave by William J. Yeatman, no place, to Edward Moore, [Iberville Parish?]
Yeatman sold Moore a male slave named Henry, about twenty years old, for $800. Moore had the document recorded in Iberville Parish on 1840 June 10., larc@tulane.edu

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