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Giuseppe Ferrata Score Collection
Guiseppe Ferrata (1865-1928) was a respected concert pianist and composer in the United States. Prior to emigrating from Italy to the United States in 1892, Ferrata studied piano with Sgambati and Franz Liszt at the Accademia di S. Cecilia in Rome. After holding several teaching posts in the Northeast, Ferrata became the first teacher of piano and composition at the Tulane University Music Department (formerly the Sophie Newcomb College). He held this post until his death in 1982. As one of the founding faculty members, Ferrata’s influence on the early growth of the music department was substantial. During his career as an educator, Ferrata continued to compose music which won recognition at several competitions including the Music Teachers’ National Association Competition (1897), the Sonzogna Opera Competition of Milan (1903), and the Art Society of Pittsburgh Competition (1908). Though largely forgotten today, Ferrata’s works were generally well-received and performed across the United States. This collection includes more than 30 works published between 1901 and 1921. His versatility as a composer is highlighted by the variety of genres, from light songs, to solo piano works, masses, and string quartets. For more information about Guiseppe Ferrata, see: Baron, John H. 100 Years Newcomb-Tulane Music Department (1909-2009). New Orleans: John Baron, 2009. Eanes, Edward. “Ferrata, Giuseppe.” In Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/subscriber/article/grove/music/44655 (accessed May 23, 2012). Shipley, L.P. “Memoires and Music of Guiseppe Ferrata, a Pupil of Liszt.” In Journal of the American Liszt Society 28 (1990), 31-41.
Hogan Jazz Archive Photography Collection
The general graphics collection of the Hogan Jazz Archive contains approximately 6,000 images documenting people, places and events important to the study of New Orleans jazz. Included among the photographers whose work resides in the general graphics collection are Ernest Bellocq, Arthur P. Bedou, Villard Paddio, John Kuhlman, Don Perry, Florence Mars, William Russell, Alden Ashforth, Lee Friedlander, Bill Gottlieb, Ray Avery, Jack Hurley, Grauman Marks, Harriet Blum, Michael P. Smith, and many others.
Howard-Tilton Memorial Library Publications and Ephemera
The Howard-Tilton Memorial Library Publications and Ephemera Collection consists of reports, guides, photographs, videos, and other ephemera related to the library and its history. Originally founded in 1938 by combining the three pre-existing libraries of Howard, Tilton, and Newcomb, the Howard-Tilton Memorial Library has been a hub of Tulane University life for fifty years. This collection will be updated as new material becomes available.
Images from the Civil War and Reconstruction
The Louisiana Research Collection preserves a renowned collection of images pertaining to the Civil War and its aftermath. Among its holdings are more than 1,000 photographs, lithographs, and drawings from the Louisiana Historical Association depicting the Civil War and Reconstruction era. Subjects include political leaders, soldier and regimental portraits, studio portraits of general officers, photographs of memorial committees and veterans’ organizations, and forts and battlefields. Also included are images pertaining to the Army of Northern Virginia, the Washington Artillery, and photographs of Confederate monuments. Many of the images are unique, and many are by some of New Orleans’s more noted photographers.
Jambalaya and T-Wave Yearbooks
The Jambalaya yearbook began publication in 1896, but was not published from 1997-2003, nor in 2007. It ceased publication in 2009. Completely produced by students, these visual time-capsules document the daily life of students at Tulane University and the former Newcomb College, as well as highlighting special events which impacted their collegiate experience. Up until the early 1980s, students from all Tulane University schools and colleges were included in these yearbooks. In 1982, the students of the School of Medicine launched their own yearbook, the "T-Wave", which is also available digitally through the Tulane University Digital Library. All of the Tulane yearbooks are keyword-searchable and downloadable as PDF files.
James Freret Architectural Drawings
James Freret Architectural Drawings features 150 projects from the office of 19th century New Orleans architect James Freret. Freret (1838-1897) was born in New Orleans to a prominent family. His mother was Livie (DArensbourg) Freret, his father James P. Freret operated a cotton press. His uncle was William Freret who served as mayor of New Orleans (1840-1842; 1843-1844), and his cousin was William A. Freret, also a prominent New Orleans architect. William A. and James collaborated on the completion of the cast iron constructed Moresque Building, which was begun by William A. before the Civil War, and completed by the cousins afterwards. Before the Civil War, James trained in the office of New Orleans architect George Purves. In the early 1860s, he studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris under Charles-Auguste Questal. Following the outbreak of the war, he returned to Louisiana to take a commission as an officer in the Confederate Armys engineering corps. After being wounded in battle, he returned to New Orleans before the end of the war, to take up work as an architect. Freret designed many important institutional and commercial structures in New Orleans and Louisiana, but was most prolific as a residential architect. This online collection includes many of his most important works, including buildings for the Little Sisters of the Poor (1886), the Gothic Revival Masonic Hall (1867-1871), the Jewish Widows and Orphans Home (1868), and proposals for four different designs for the congregation of Temple Sinai (1870). Residential plans include projects for many wealthy leading citizens of the day, but also more modest homes, including Frerets own home. These presentation drawings are executed on small 19 x 13 sheets, in delicate watercolor. Most sheets include an exterior front elevation and floor plans for one project, but a few sheets have two projects. The Southeastern Architectural Archive also has representation of many other important 19th century New Orleans architects, including father and son James Gallier, Sr. and Jr., brothers Charles Bingley and James H. Dakin, Richard Esterbrook, John Turpin, Thomas Sully, and many others.
John Kennedy Toole Papers
LaRC Manuscripts Collection 740 consists of personal and literary papers of beloved New Orleans novelist, John Kennedy Toole (1937-1969), a posthumous winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. Much of the personal memorabilia of Toole’s life, and his parents’ lives, was originally preserved by the collection’s donor, Thelma Ducoing Toole, who was persistently intent on the publication of her son’s comedic masterpiece, A Confederacy of Dunces. Toole, born in New Orleans, excelled in all levels of his education, graduating Phi Beta Kappa with Honors in English at Tulane University at the age of twenty. He agonized as to whether to teach or to write, and attended graduate school at Columbia while teaching at Hunter College. His opportunity to spend time writing fiction came ironically while stationed with the Army in San Juan, Puerto Rico, while his job was teaching English as a second language. After returning to New Orleans, he met with disappointment attempting to publish A Confederacy of Dunces. He continued to struggle with his relationships, basic life choices and depression, again vascillating between attempting to teach and attempting to write, but sadly his life ultimately ended in suicide. Many years later, his ground-breaking novel was published by Louisiana State University Press, primarily through the efforts of his mother, who, with manuscript in hand, was fortunate to find a receptive audience in well-known novelist Walker Percy. The materials in the JKT Digital Collection are made available for research and study purposes only. Any other use requires permission. For further information on the permissions process and guidelines, see the permissions page of the Louisiana Research Collection http://larc.tulane.edu/services/publication-permission. The LaRC respects the intellectual property rights of others. The inclusion of materials in this digital collection is the result of either explicit permission from the copyright owner or a good faith belief, following reasonable investigation, that the work is in the public domain or available for purposes of research and scholarship under fair use principles of the copyright laws of the United States. If you believe that your copyrighted work has been improperly included in this digital collection, please notify the LaRC by contacting larc@tulane.edu.
John Leonard Riddell papers
The collection consists of diaries, notebooks, newspaper clippings, and other printed material of John Leonard Riddell. John Leonard Riddell, a physician, biologist, and inventor, was born in Leyden, Massachusetts, February 20, 1807. In 1835 he was appointed professor of chemistry and botany at Cincinnati Medical College and published his "Synopsis of the Flora of the Western States." He received his medical degree in 1836 from Cincinnati Medical College. He then went to New Orleans as professor of chemistry at the Medical College of Louisiana, where he invented the binocular microscope. He continued to work at the Medical College throughout the rest of his life. In New Orleans, he also became smelter and refiner at the U.S. Mint, a member of the River Control Commission, Postmaster of New Orleans, and a member of the Board of Inquiry into causes of yellow fever.
Joseph Merrick Jones Steamboat Photographs
The Joseph Merrick Jones Steamboat Photographs collection consists of 357 glass plate negatives of Mississippi riverboats, circa 1890 – 1940. The plates were collected by Donald T. Wright, who edited and published the “Waterways Journal” between 1921 and 1965. This collection documents steamboats and other riverboats on the Mississippi River and its major tributaries between roughly 1880 and 1940. These images showcase sternwheelers, sidewheelers, tugboats, packets, showboats, and other types of riverboats during their construction phase, traveling along the Mississippi and other rivers, and being dismantled, as well as river towns, docks, riverboat captains, industry executives, and other people involved with waterways. Many of the images are of riverboats in New Orleans and so include views of the Port of New Orleans and other New Orleans scenes. The Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC) contains materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law. LaRC makes its collections available for research and study purposes only. Any other use requires permission from LaRC. If permission for additional use is granted by the Louisiana Research Collection, the patron has the sole responsibility (1) for determining whether the intended use requires the consent of any third party and (2) for obtaining any necessary consents or licenses from the intellectual property rights holders. So far no copyright mark has been found on any of the images in this collection. Under the standards of the 1909 Copyright Act, any published, exhibited work not bearing a copyright mark is in the public domain. For the non-published, non-exhibited works in this collection, copyright resides with an unknown entity until life +70, but there is no information on who that person might be for these images.
Joseph Woodson "Pops" Whitesell Photographs
2,600 glass plate negatives by noted New Orleans photographer Joseph Woodson “Pops” Whitesell (1876 – 1958). Internationally-renowned, Whitesell was one of the most exhibited photographers of his day, including an exhibition of his work at the Smithsonian in 1946. Today his work is part of the permanent collections of many institutions, including the Brooklyn Museum, the Smithsonian, the Chicago Historical Society, the New Orleans Museum of Art, and the Louisiana State Museum. Whitesell moved to New Orleans from his native Indiana in 1918. By 1921 he had established a studio in the French Quarter where he became a noted portrait photographer. In addition to documenting New Orleans society, including debutantes, wedding parties, boards of directors, and Carnival royalty, Whitesell was a central figure of French Quarter bohemia and was part of the arts and preservation movement that became known as the French Quarter Renaissance.
The Junior Philharmonic Society of New Orleans
Digitizing the collection of programs, photographs, audio and video files, newspaper and magazine articles on the past performances of the Jr. Philharmonic Society of New Orleans from it's inception.The Junior Philharmonic Society of New Orleans was incorporated as a non-profit, cultural organization in the State of Louisiana in 1948 by Newcomb alumna Katherine Nolan Kammer. It's mission is to give talented, young student instrumentalists, vocalists and dancers an opportunity to perform in a recital held in a professional setting, and to teach music appreciation to children attending the programs. Performers are chosen by audition, and all performances are free and open to the public.
Kim Lacy Rogers Civil Rights Oral History Collection
This collection consists of sound recordings of oral history interviews conducted by Kim Lacy Rogers from 1978-1998 with persons involved in desegregation and civil rights in New Orleans. There include opponents and proponents of segregation. This acclaimed collection represents one of the most comprehensive resources anywhere on Civil Rights Movement activism in New Orleans, and formed the basis of Rogers’ book Righteous Lives: Narratives of the New Orleans Civil Rights Movement. Interviewees include local heroes and national figures such as Daniel Byrd, Albert Dent, Tom Dent, Lolis Elie, Oretha Castle Haley, Rosa Keller, Maurice “Moon” Landrieu, Rudy Lombard, Ernest N. “Dutch” Morial, John O’Neal, John P. Nelson, Revius Ortique, Jerome Smith, Betty Wisdom, and Skelly Wright; interviewees also include a few opposing voices, those of ardent segregationists such as Jackson Ricau and George Singelman. Rogers is a Civil Rights Movement specialist and an oral historian, making these highly intimate and revealing interviews. Contact Amistad Research Center for additional interviews. Further interviews with the following subjects will be added to this collection as they become available: Leonard Burns, Daniel E. Byrd, Raphael Cassimere, Doris Jean Castle-Scott, James A. Dombrowski, Rev. Albert D'Orlando, Lolis Elie, Julian B. Feibelman, Father Joseph Fichter, Harry Gamble Jr., Robert Glass, Richard Goins, Helen Mervis, Jack Nelson, Revius Ortique, Matt Suarez, Daniel C. Thompson, Bruce Waltzer, and Betty Wisdom. This collection was processed under a grant from the Keller Family Foundation. Digital transfer of oral history audio cassettes and creation of interview summaries provided by funding from the RosaMary Foundation.
Leon Trice Louisiana Political Photographs
This collection of Louisiana political photographs spans the 1920s through the 1940s; most of the photographs are from the late 1920s through the 1930s. It depicts many of Louisiana's most famous elected officials in a variety of situations: campaigning, at home with family, in staged photo opportunities, at work, and even lying in repose. Among the political leaders featured are Huey P. Long, Earl Long, Richard Leche, O.K. Allen, and others. Leon Trice was a New Orleans area photographer active from 1920 to 1972. He worked for the New Orleans States newspaper and later for the Associated Press. He also ran his own studio.
Lion’s Tale (2000)
Lion’s Tale is a documentary produced and directed Mary Anne Mushatt. It provides a platform for residents of Louisiana’s River Road, giving voice and presence to the stories of their people. Individuals, past and present, who, by living their lives created the diverse and vibrant communities that give the region vitality and root them in their shared history. Members of the African-American community and Houma Nation tell their stories, bringing the lore and legacy of the past into their own homes. As Cathy Hambrick, of the River Road African-American Museum states, “This is all about us, and it’s not negative … We are the descendants of the survivors.”
Lippman Collection of Civil War Postal Covers
Postal covers are envelopes with printed designs commemorating an event, person, or cause. These postal covers were created during the Civil War in support of the Union, with one postal cover declaring support for the Confederacy. They include symbols and allegories for Union causes, Union slogans, images of Union heroes, and caricatures of Confederate leaders. They are an unusual resource for studying the popular culture and social history of the Civil War. These covers were collected by Alfred S. Lippman of Morgan City, Louisiana, who donated them to the Louisiana Research Collection in 2009. An attorney, Lippman has been active in civic and business affairs. Among his many contributions are his services on the boards of the Morgan City Harbor and Terminal District, 1967-2004 (President, 1972-1978-1999); Louisiana Board of Tax Appeals, 1980-1985; the Pan American Commission, 1990-1992; the Board of Supervisors, Louisiana Universities, 2000-2005; Whitney National Bank and Whitney Holding Corp., 1997- present; and the United States Coast Guard Foundation, 1990-2005. For more information please visit the LaRC website: http://larc.tulane.edu/ This project was made possible in part by the generous support of the Gail and Alfred S. Lippman Family Fund.
The Long Civil Rights Movement: Photographs from the Ronnie Moore Papers, 1964 -1972
This digital collection, funded by the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation, consists of photographs from the Ronnie Moore papers located at the Amistad Research Center. Moore is a civil rights activist and community development consultant who trained leaders in community organization, youth development, cultural diversity, and team building. Moore was the field secretary in the South for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the executive director of the Scholarship, Education and Defense Fund for Racial Equality, Inc. (SEDFRE). These photographs were collected by Moore in his roles with CORE and SEDFRE. The Ronnie Moore digital collection captures the political and social empowerment of African Americans in the South during the 1960s. Images of CORE activists, and the African American populations they served, are displayed in photographs of voter registration drives in Florida and South Carolina, freedom schools in Mississippi, and direct protest demonstrations in Louisiana and North Carolina. Images from Moore’s work with SEDFRE emphasize the economic activism carried out by African Americans during the late 1960s and 1970s in Northern states such as New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Indiana, and Maryland. Other economic initiatives depicted are farming cooperatives in Louisiana, job training for youth and adults in Mississippi, and the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign in Washington D.C. Most importantly, Moore’s photographs exhibit a shift in the Civil Rights Movement from direct protests targeting disenfranchisement and segregationist practices in the 1960s, to federally funded programs that were created to raise the economic viability of African Americans in the 1970s. Students, teachers, researchers, and others are encouraged to contact the Center about this digital collection and the Ronnie Moore papers. For more information, please visit the Center’s website at http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org/.
The Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Boeri Collection of Cuban-American Radionovelas, 1963-1970
From his office and studios on the fifth floor of “The Freedom Tower” in Miami, Italian-American Louis J. Boeri and his company, America's Productions, Inc.(API), formed a radio programming empire, selling their products to the United States government, to 200 radio stations in Latin America and Spain, and to Spanish-language radio stations in the United States during the latter half of the 1960s. With scripts penned by acclaimed Cuban scriptwriters in exile and Mexican writers as well, America’s Production Inc. produced two types of entertainment radio programming: one kind featuring political content, and a second kind, generally characterized as ‘pure entertainment.’ The entertainment programming was designed for both U.S. Latino and Latin American audiences and the content included radionovelas/dramas, comedies, advice programs, biblical dramas, mysteries, spy stories, and variety shows. The Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Boeri Collection of Cuban-American Radionovelas, 1963-1970 provides over 200 titles from API’s unique entertainment catalog contained in the collection of the same name held by the Latin American Library, the vast majority of which falls within the radionovela genre. The digitized recordings come from the master reel-to-reel audio tapes created by API for its entertainment library. Each title with its constituent episodes will now be available in digital audio format for the first time since they originally aired in the late 1960s. Along with the radionovelas recordings themselves, the collection includes images of some of API’s promotional materials that describe the process of creating a radionovela program and brief storyline descriptions, ephemera, and photographs of the actors, actresses, writers, and production staff of API. The digital version of the Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Boeri Collection of Cuban-American Radionovelas affords a rare resource for the study of the history of the political, cultural, and commercial ties between the United States and Cuba via public broadcasting during a pivotal moment in the 2oth century. The collection offers new perspectives and insights into the use of media as political and cultural propaganda by Cuba and the United States during the Cold War era, as well as the history of popular culture and mass media in the wake of the 1959 Cuban Revolution among Spanish-speaking audiences in the United States and the Spanish-speaking countries to which the programs were exported. Descripción Desde su oficina y estudios en el quinto piso del "The Freedom Tower" en Miami, el empresario italoamericano Louis J. Boeri y su compañía, America's Productions, Inc. (API), formaron un imperio de programación de radio, vendiendo sus programas al gobierno estadounidense, a más de 200 emisoras de radio por toda América Latina y España, y a las emisoras de radio de habla hispana en los Estados Unidos durante la segunda mitad de los años sesenta. Con guiones escritos por aclamados guionistas cubanos exiliados y escritores mexicanos, America's Productions, Inc. producía dos tipos de programas: el primero de contenido político y el segundo, de carácter más general, se distinguía como "puro entretenimiento." Diseñado para un público latinoamericano y latino residente en EE.UU., el entretenimiento puro incluía radionovelas/dramas, comedias, programas de consejos y autoayuda, dramas bíblicos, misterios, historias de espías, y espectáculos de variedades. La Colección de Radionovelas Cubanoamericanas Louis J. Boeri y Minín Bujones Boeri, 1963-1970, ofrece más de 200 títulos de la programación de la API, contenidos en la colección del mismo nombre resguardada en la Biblioteca Latinoamericana. La gran mayoría de estos títulos pertenece al género de la radionovela. Las grabaciones digitalizadas provienen de las cintas de audio maestras creadas por la API para su biblioteca de programas de entretenimiento. Cada título con sus episodios constitutivos se encuentra disponible en formato de audio digital por primera vez desde su primera transmisión a finales de la década de 1960. Junto con las grabaciones de radionovelas, la colección digital incluye imágenes de algunos de los materiales promocionales de la API que describen el proceso de creación de un programa de radionovela así como breves reseñas, publicaciones efímeras y fotografías de actores, actrices, escritores y personal de producción de la API. La versión digital de la Colección Louis J. Boeri y Minín Bujones Boeri de radionovelas cubanoamericanas ofrece un recurso único para el estudio de la historia de los nexos políticos, culturales y comerciales entre Estados Unidos y Cuba a través de la radiodifusión pública durante de un momento crítico del siglo XX. La colección ofrece nuevas perspectivas e ideas sobre el uso de los medios de comunicación como propaganda política y cultural con respecto a Cuba por parte de Estados Unidos durante la Guerra Fría, así como la historia de la cultura popular y los medios de comunicación a partir de la Revolución Cubana de 1959 entre el público hispanohablante en los Estados Unidos así como en los demás países donde se exportaban estos programas.
Louisiana Menu and Restaurant Collection
The Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC) preserves extensive holdings documenting Louisiana's food and cooking culture, including several thousand menus, restaurant brochures, bar flyers, and other items essential for understanding the cuisine and food industry of our state. This online collection comprises three parts. Currently available are restaurant menus from the 1930s to the present. LaRC also preserves menus and brochures for hotel restaurants, as well as drink lists and promotional flyers for bars. Those extend to the 1910s and will go online during the summer and fall of 2012. Third, LaRC preserves banquet menus for organizations holding meetings and conventions. Extending back to the 1870s, we hope to put those online in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. While this online collection can be an invaluable service to researchers, we hope it will also spur a greater awareness of the importance of menus and restaurant brochures in documenting and preserving Louisiana foodways. This will therefore be an ongoing collection with new items added as we receive them. If you have a Louisiana menu or a menu collection, please contact us at larc@tulane.edu or 504-314-7833 so we can permanently preserve it and make it available to researchers from around the world. Note that LaRC's menu and food brochure collection is only one part of its extensive holdings about Louisiana's food heritage, including cookbooks, guidebooks, and publications of Louisiana food processors; publications and reports of food, dining, and agricultural trade organizations; and publications of food and wine clubs. The Louisiana Research Collection is a major research source for food professional organizations, clubs, and food service industries in Louisiana, preserving such serial titles as Dough Boy (Published in the Interest of the Southern Bakery Industry), Louisiana Grocer, and The Mixer, official organ of the Master Bakers' Association of New Orleans, as well as documents about Louisiana gourmand clubs, such as the Confrerie des chevaliers du Tastevin and the Ancient Order of Creole Gourmets. LaRC also preserves archival holdings pertaining to food and foodways in Louisiana, such as the Lafcadio Hearn papers (which include Creole recipes, proverbs and remedies loaned to Hearn by Dr. Rudolph Matas), the Jackson Brewing Company records, and the recipe books of noted sculptor Angela Gregory's mother and grandmother. To search our holdings and to learn more about how you can help preserve Louisiana's food heritage, please visit the LaRC website.
Louisiana Political Ephemera, 1860-1920
Ephemera are small printed items such as pamphlets and leaflets. These political flyers, brochures, and campaign cards concern both New Orleans local elections and Louisiana statewide elections. They preserve a wealth of information including names, parties, factions, offices, and dates of elections. They also often include information about a candidate’s family, religion, race, political beliefs, social activities, and businesses.
Louisiana Purchase and Louisiana Colonial History
Part of the Teaching American History in Louisiana (TAHIL) program

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