Lansing Porter Family Papers, 1861-1863, 1906

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Letter "...since we left New York Harbor," 1861 December 11-14
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth Porter, informing her that they are sailing along the coast of Key West, soon to make their way back to Fort Pickens. Lansing writes that he has received a package from the children that moves him to tears. He assures them that nothing of monumental importance has happened to him and the other men., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Annie, 1862 April 4
Lansing Porter writes a response to his daughter, Annie's "spunky" letter, explaining why he wrote to little Lansing before her. He tells her about two deserters that appeared earlier and that he wanted to look upon a ship they found but he could not because he was acting regimental officer of the day., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to dear sister, 1862 February 6 and February 18
Elizabeth Porter forwards her husband, Lansing, a letter that her sister wrote to her in regards to some letters being sent back. Elizabeth informs Lansing of many events at home including the fact that the children had the measles and are still not any better., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1861 December 17
A letter from Lansing Porter to Elizabeth Porter describing the difficulties of reaching the shore from the ship. Lansing gives a brief summary of the day's happenings and then requests to be sent a new pair of cotton stockings., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1861 December 26
In this letter Lansing Porter informs his wife, Elizabeth that he has been sick for the past week due to the many changes he has experienced in the South. He also adds that diarrhea is prevalent in the camp. He mentions that a few "contrabands" slipped through to the Fort sharing news of strange fighting in Virginia and reporting that supplies from New Orleans and Mobile have been cut off., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1861 December 26
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth Porter explaining the proximity of all the rebel bases from Fort Pickens. He discusses the severity of disregarding orders in the camp, and tells about how a man had been court-martialed for falling asleep on duty. The letter is accompanied by a hand-drawn map of Pensacola Bay., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1861 December 6
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife Elizabeth Porter about his regiment having taken to the sea, traveling south down the coast of Florida. He writes about seasickness, being given wine at the table, and the weather getting warmer., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1861 March 6
Lansing Porter writes to his wife, Elizabeth about his initial experiences at Fort Pickens. He gives a good description of its surroundings and mentions Rhode Island, the Santa Rosa, the cold weather, and a traitor spy. The letter cuts off abruptly., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 April 1
A letter from Lansing Porter to Elizabeth Porter after finally having found the time to write. In his letter, Lansing gives explanations of the changing of the rotations, drills, and inspections, as well as informing his wife that he recently had to bury a man from his company., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 April 29
A letter from Lansing Porter informing his wife, Elizabeth Porter that he has received her letters from the month of March. He writes that he awaits more letters from her and from the Union Army in order to receive information regarding a battle that was recently fought in Virginia, as well as one in Fort Jackson. Lansing also writes that during the end of the month of April means that troops must be “re-mustered” and reviewed by commanding officers. He adds that his particular company has a very good reputation., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 April 4
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth Porter, informing her that he has received the letters from her and the children. In his letter, Lansing describes the utter cruelty of the sand fleas and mosquitoes while on night duty. He updates her on another ship seen out in the bay that was not close enough for them to shoot at., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 August 14
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth Porter complaining about the heat and how he has not yet received the package containing his summer clothes. Lansing explains that the temperature has ranged between 82 and 88 degrees for the past two months. He sends instructions regarding the proper way to send butter in such high heat, and tells Elizabeth that she should not send him perishable goods, but that dried apples are of great value to him., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 August 24
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth, reporting that Farragut and his vessel have arrived in Pensacola. He informs her that Bro. Hudson writes to him often and goes on to describe his company's total losses, explaining that western Florida is now attached to the "Department of the Gulf." He he and his company are now under General Butler who may order some of the troops to New Orleans. Lansing shares his comfort in thinking that General Arnold will keep the 75th in Pensacola, and adds that there is not much more fear of Yellow Fever anymore., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 February 24
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth Porter informing her that he had just received several weeks of her letters in one batch. He also reports that two men drowned due to boats capsizing and that Col. Brown's health has been poor. He tells Elizabeth about his company's outrage because the paymaster will only pay them for their first five weeks of service. He then expresses his anxiety about his father-in-law., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 January 15
A letter from Lansing Porter to Elizabeth Porter expressing his frustration at not recieving any correspondence from her when a steamer arrived with mail from Auburn, New York., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 January 16
A letter from Lansing Porter to Elizabeth Porter describing a walk he went on with Bro. Hudson, and their amusement at observing the way in which cows are transported onto the island. Lansing explains that they get stopped at the end of the island by a guard on a horse. He tells Elizabeth that men have been chosen to go to Washington in order to get more recruits, and expresses his relief at not being chosen, for it is too soon for him to show his face in Auburn, New York, again. Lansing then recounts an instance where rebel "contrabands" crossed over their shores,with news of the recent bombardment, which was most likely exagerated., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 January 17
A letter from Lansing Porter giving his wife, Elizabeth a brief explanation regarding drills. lansing informs her that he heard mention of them in one of his friend's letters. He adds that there is no winter in Pensacola., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 January 2
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth, describing details regarding a Naval Attack at Fort Pickens and Col. Brown's immediate retaliation., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 January 29
A letter from Lansing Porter to Elizabeth about a great fire raging across Pensacola Bay at a rebel fort. He writes that there was a blockade further up the bay, with rockets shooting through the air, a call to arms, and then a false alarm., larc@tulane.edu
Letter to Elizabeth Porter, 1862 July 26
A letter from Lansing Porter to his wife, Elizabeth Porter writing that it has been two weeks since he and his company have been ordered from Pickens, and that his new established camp area has allowed him to live in a house. Lansing goes on to describe the house and explains how he came by it by having to write many letters to several important people in order to get it approved. He also complains about the atrocious cost of butter and how she should send him some. He adds that when he received her package, the letter was so stained that he could not decipher it., larc@tulane.edu

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