French Colonial, Spanish Colonial, and Nineteenth-Century Louisiana Documents

Description

Louisiana documents from 1655 to 1924 with a strong emphasis on the French colonial, Spanish colonial, and early national periods. Includes correspondence, land sales, slave sales, plantation journals, business licenses, property sales, professional and family papers, legal documents, land grants, tax receipts, theater programs, broadsides, engravings, and more. A noted Louisiana document collector, Felix Kuntz (1890-1971) donated his collection to Tulane University in four installments beginning in 1954 and requested that it be named after his parents. Today, the Rosemond E. and Emile Kuntz Collection (LaRC Manuscripts Collection 600) is a renowned resource for studying Louisiana with a special emphasis on New Orleans. Particularly noteworthy are records from the Company of the Indies, papers of Francisco Bouligny describing early French and Spanish authority over Louisiana, documents spanning Louisiana's entry into the United States through the Civil War and New Orleans? growth as a major commercial center, New Orleans municipal records (1805-1850s, including an 1805 census), and several small personal and family collections such as those of John McDonogh, the Pontalba family, and the Pierson family.

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Abstract of documents in the Pointe Coupée Parish archives relating to the concession of Paris Duvernay de la Garde to the village of the Bayagoulas, in conjunction with the succession of Claude Trénonay
The documents here summarized gave a history of a concession first granted by the French Crown to Paris Duvernay de la Garde that later passed to Claude Trénonay, nephew of Claude Trénonay de Chamfret, manager of the concession. The procès-verbal of the inventory of the Trénonay estate took place in 1792. Judge Robin attested that he had found no other documents relating to the succession when he searched the parish archives., larc@tulane.edu
Abstract of documents to support claims
The suit concerned Lesassier's handling of the estate inherited by his ward [Marie Louise] Dauberville from her late father [Vincent Guillaume Le Senechal] Dauberville, particularly in regard to Lesassier's failure to collect sums owed to the succession by Villars Dubreuil., larc@tulane.edu
Acceptance of mortgage created by David B. Morgan and his wife, Saint Tammany Parish on 1838 July 25, by which [General] David Bannister Morgan and his wife Mary Constance Baham, both of the same parish, created a mortgage in favor of the Citizens' Bank t
Before Notary Seghers, New Orleans, Edmund John Forstall, President of the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana, declared that he had taken cogniznance of an act passed before Judge Lyman Briggs of Saint Tammany Parish on 1838 July 25, by which [General] David Bannister Morgan and his wife Mary Constance Baham, both of the same parish, created a mortgage in favor of the Citizens' Bank to secure acquisition of an additional twenty shares of capital stock valued at $2,000. The Morgans mortgaged five lots they owned on Apollon Street in Faubourg Religieuses, larc@tulane.edu
Account of pay and clothing of A[natole] L.H. Kernion, Company C., 22nd Louisiana Regiment, [Mobile, Louisiana]
The account gave a physical description of Kernion, personal and military history, pay record, and a list of clothing issued to him at General Hospital Cantey in Mobile., larc@tulane.edu
Account of the fire that devastated New Orleans
This printed account described the catastrophic fire that destroyed a large part of New Orleans in 1788. The fire broke out about 1:30 P.M. in the center of town. A strong wind quickly spread the flames in all directions. In less than five hours more than 850 buildings had been destroyed. "The next morning," the report continued, "what a spectacle to see: where the day before was a flourishing city, only smoking debris and a pile of ruins remained..., and persons of both sexes and all ages and stations in life wandered about in a silent stupor." The account ended with praise for the Governor and other officials, who gave generous assistance to the people. [Various accounts of the fire appear in Lauro A. de Rojas, "The Great Fire of 1788 in New Orleans," LHQ, XX, 578-589, in which is included a translation of the above report, and in Louisiana Historical Society, Publications, VIII, 59-62.], larc@tulane.edu
Account of the work of convicts employed by New Orleans in May 1825
New Orleans. Account of the work of convicts employed by the city in May 1825. And order to pay M. Holland the amount of the account. In French and in English., larc@tulane.edu
Act Incorporating the City of Carrolton
New Orleans. Act incorporating the City of Carrollton. Printed document., larc@tulane.edu
Act of Congress of the United States regarding land claim decisions in the Louisiana Territory
The title of legislation was "Act enabling the claimants of lands within the the limits of the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas to institute proceedings to try the validity of their claims." Those who had legally received French or Spanish concessions prior to 1804 March 10 could file a petition with the District Court of Missouri to substantiate the claim. The law outlined procedures and requirements for receiving titles. [The heirs of Jean Antoine Bernard Dauterive based their claim to Vermilion Prairie on this Act and on a subsequent one passed by Congress 1844 June 17.], larc@tulane.edu
Act of Congress of the United States regarding land claims in the Louisiana Territory
This is a French translation of the preceding entry., larc@tulane.edu
Act of donation of a slave by David Lejeune and his wife, New Feliciana, to Carlota Bauvais
Before Thomas Estevan, Commandant at Feliciana, David Lejeune and his wife Constanza Bauvais signed an act of donation, by which document they gave their niece Carlota Bauvais, to be her slave, a little Negro girl named Ana, approximately seven years old, a "Criolla." The child was their property by virtue of her having been born in their home of their slave Isabel., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage granted by Bernard Marigny and his wife Anne Mathilde Morales to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana
Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans, Marigny and his wife declared that, by an act passed on 1836 June 27, Marigny had acquired from Marie Louise Panis, a free woman of color, 490 shares of capital stock in the Citizens' Bank. They acknowledged that they owed on a sugar plantation situated in Plaquemines Parish, nine leagues below New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. Also mortgaged as part of the property were the house, the sugar mill and ancillary buildings, an infirmary, kitchens, slave cabins, a warehouse, tools, carts, and livestock, as well as seventy slaves (names and ages given), who lived there. Edmond Jean Forstall, President of the Citizens' Bank, accepted the mortgage., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage granted by Bernard Marigny and his wife Anne Mathilde Morales to the Citizens' Bank of New Orleans
Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans, Bernard Marigny and his wife declared that Marigny had subscribed to 945 shares of the capital funds stock, worth $94,500, in the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana. As security for the value of the amount subscribed the couple granted the bank a mortgage on a sugar plantation situated in Plaquemines Parish on the right bank of the Mississippi about nine leagues below New Orleans. The mortgage covered buildings and equipment on the slave cabins, a warehouse, stables, carts, tools, and livestock. Marigny, also mortgaged the seventy-four slaves (names and ages given) who lived on the plantation. The President of the Citizens' Bank, Lucien Guillaume Hiligsberg, accepted the mortgage on behalf of the institution., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage granted by Elijah Thompson, Amite County, Mississippi, to the Mississippi Union Bank
Elijah Thompson had subscribed for seventy-two shares, of $100 each, of stock of the Mississippi Union Bank. As security for the sum, he mortgaged to the Bank 414 acres of land and four slaves., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage granted by Elisée E. Mailhoit, Assumption Parish, in favor of Jean Baptiste Aucoin, Assumption Parish
Before Notary Public Amedée Damas, Malhoit declared that he had drawn two promissory notes in the amount of $8,120 and $7,560, payable in favor of Jean Baptiste Aucoin and his wife Azelie Boudreau. To secure payment Malhoit gave Aucoin a mortgage on a sugar plantation, situated on Bayou Lafourche fourteen miles below Napoleonville, and the forty slaves (names and ages given) on the property., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage granted by Hortense Lacoste, widow of Antonio Ducros, Orleans Parish, to the Citizens' Bank of Louisiana
Before Notary Public Théodore Seghers in New Orleans the widow ducros declared that, by an act passed on 1836 April 14, she received from Alonzo Morphy 190 shares of capital stock in the Citizens' Bank, the value of which was $19,000. She further acknowledged that she owed the amount to the bank, and to guarantee it she gave the bank a mortgage on a sugar plantation situated in Orleans Parish, five miles below New Orleans on the right bank of the Mississippi. the mortgage covered all buildings, equipment, tools, and livestock, as well as sixty-four slaves (names and ages given), who lived on the property. The document gives a history of previous liens on the plantation., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage granted by James Baily Sullivan, Rapides Parish, to the Bank of Louisiana
Before Notary Public William Christy in New Orleans, J.B. Sullivan declared that in 1832 and 1836 he had mortgaged his plantation in Rapides Parish to the Bank of Louisiana to secure loans that were now due. As additional security he, by the present act, gave the bank a mortgage on certain tracts of land adjacent to the plantation, along with all buildings, equipment, and livestock thereon. The mortgage also included forty-eight slaves, whose names and ages were given. Sullivan further agreed that if he failed to pay his obligation to the bank, it could secure a court order to seize the mortgaged property and sell it., larc@tulane.edu
Act of mortgage, New Orleans
Joseph Villars Dubreuil, Captain in the militia, and his wife, Juana Cathalina LaBoulaye, declared that they had purchased a certain property, together with dwelling, Negroes, and animals thereon from Francisca Petit de Coulange, widow of Vizente Guillermo Dauberville. They had already paid 80,000 livres, and by the present act they obligated themselves to pay another 80,000 in two equal installments. To secure payment the Villars Dubreuils gave Mme Dauberville a mortgage on all their property., larc@tulane.edu
Act of retrocession, New Orleans
Villars Dubreuil retroceded to the widow Dauberville, now wife of [Jean Pierre Robert] Gerard de Villemont, and to Mlle Dauberville a property and dwelling situated half a league upstream from New Orleans. He guaranteed that he had made repairs and construction in accordance with the agreement of 1766 July 10. He also restored to the Dauberville estate thirty-one slaves, whose names were listed., larc@tulane.edu
Act of sale at public auction of a property in Terrebonne Parish to Brigitte Bellanger, widow of H.S. Thibodaux
Sheriff Ruben Bush of Terrebonne Parish declared that he had seized a tract of land in the parish situated on Bayou Terrebonne, about five miles from Thibodauville, and bounded by lands of Lemuel Tanner and H.C. and H.S. Thibodaux. Bush advertised the sale of the land at a public auction to take place on 1837 September 4 and set a value of $40,000 on the tract. At the sale Brigitte Bellanger, widow of H.S. Thibodaux, purchased the property for $35,500 cash, which Bush acknowledged having received., larc@tulane.edu

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