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John Kennedy Toole Papers
LaRC Manuscripts Collection 740 consists of personal and literary papers of beloved New Orleans novelist, John Kennedy Toole (1937-1969), a posthumous winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. Much of the personal memorabilia of Toole’s life, and his parents’ lives, was originally preserved by the collection’s donor, Thelma Ducoing Toole, who was persistently intent on the publication of her son’s comedic masterpiece, A Confederacy of Dunces. Toole, born in New Orleans, excelled in all levels of his education, graduating Phi Beta Kappa with Honors in English at Tulane University at the age of twenty. He agonized as to whether to teach or to write, and attended graduate school at Columbia while teaching at Hunter College. His opportunity to spend time writing fiction came ironically while stationed with the Army in San Juan, Puerto Rico, while his job was teaching English as a second language. After returning to New Orleans, he met with disappointment attempting to publish A Confederacy of Dunces. He continued to struggle with his relationships, basic life choices and depression, again vascillating between attempting to teach and attempting to write, but sadly his life ultimately ended in suicide. Many years later, his ground-breaking novel was published by Louisiana State University Press, primarily through the efforts of his mother, who, with manuscript in hand, was fortunate to find a receptive audience in well-known novelist Walker Percy. The materials in the JKT Digital Collection are made available for research and study purposes only. Any other use requires permission. For further information on the permissions process and guidelines, see the permissions page of the Louisiana Research Collection http://larc.tulane.edu/services/publication-permission. The LaRC respects the intellectual property rights of others. The inclusion of materials in this digital collection is the result of either explicit permission from the copyright owner or a good faith belief, following reasonable investigation, that the work is in the public domain or available for purposes of research and scholarship under fair use principles of the copyright laws of the United States. If you believe that your copyrighted work has been improperly included in this digital collection, please notify the LaRC by contacting larc@tulane.edu.
Joseph Merrick Jones Steamboat Photographs
The Joseph Merrick Jones Steamboat Photographs collection consists of 357 glass plate negatives of Mississippi riverboats, circa 1890 – 1940. The plates were collected by Donald T. Wright, who edited and published the “Waterways Journal” between 1921 and 1965. This collection documents steamboats and other riverboats on the Mississippi River and its major tributaries between roughly 1880 and 1940. These images showcase sternwheelers, sidewheelers, tugboats, packets, showboats, and other types of riverboats during their construction phase, traveling along the Mississippi and other rivers, and being dismantled, as well as river towns, docks, riverboat captains, industry executives, and other people involved with waterways. Many of the images are of riverboats in New Orleans and so include views of the Port of New Orleans and other New Orleans scenes. The Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC) contains materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law. LaRC makes its collections available for research and study purposes only. Any other use requires permission from LaRC. If permission for additional use is granted by the Louisiana Research Collection, the patron has the sole responsibility (1) for determining whether the intended use requires the consent of any third party and (2) for obtaining any necessary consents or licenses from the intellectual property rights holders. So far no copyright mark has been found on any of the images in this collection. Under the standards of the 1909 Copyright Act, any published, exhibited work not bearing a copyright mark is in the public domain. For the non-published, non-exhibited works in this collection, copyright resides with an unknown entity until life +70, but there is no information on who that person might be for these images.
Joseph Woodson "Pops" Whitesell Photographs
2,600 glass plate negatives by noted New Orleans photographer Joseph Woodson “Pops” Whitesell (1876 – 1958). Internationally-renowned, Whitesell was one of the most exhibited photographers of his day, including an exhibition of his work at the Smithsonian in 1946. Today his work is part of the permanent collections of many institutions, including the Brooklyn Museum, the Smithsonian, the Chicago Historical Society, the New Orleans Museum of Art, and the Louisiana State Museum. Whitesell moved to New Orleans from his native Indiana in 1918. By 1921 he had established a studio in the French Quarter where he became a noted portrait photographer. In addition to documenting New Orleans society, including debutantes, wedding parties, boards of directors, and Carnival royalty, Whitesell was a central figure of French Quarter bohemia and was part of the arts and preservation movement that became known as the French Quarter Renaissance.
The Junior Philharmonic Society of New Orleans
Digitizing the collection of programs, photographs, audio and video files, newspaper and magazine articles on the past performances of the Jr. Philharmonic Society of New Orleans from it's inception.The Junior Philharmonic Society of New Orleans was incorporated as a non-profit, cultural organization in the State of Louisiana in 1948 by Newcomb alumna Katherine Nolan Kammer. It's mission is to give talented, young student instrumentalists, vocalists and dancers an opportunity to perform in a recital held in a professional setting, and to teach music appreciation to children attending the programs. Performers are chosen by audition, and all performances are free and open to the public.
Leon Trice Louisiana Political Photographs
This collection of Louisiana political photographs spans the 1920s through the 1940s; most of the photographs are from the late 1920s through the 1930s. It depicts many of Louisiana's most famous elected officials in a variety of situations: campaigning, at home with family, in staged photo opportunities, at work, and even lying in repose. Among the political leaders featured are Huey P. Long, Earl Long, Richard Leche, O.K. Allen, and others. Leon Trice was a New Orleans area photographer active from 1920 to 1972. He worked for the New Orleans States newspaper and later for the Associated Press. He also ran his own studio.
Lion’s Tale (2000)
Lion’s Tale is a documentary produced and directed Mary Anne Mushatt. It provides a platform for residents of Louisiana’s River Road, giving voice and presence to the stories of their people. Individuals, past and present, who, by living their lives created the diverse and vibrant communities that give the region vitality and root them in their shared history. Members of the African-American community and Houma Nation tell their stories, bringing the lore and legacy of the past into their own homes. As Cathy Hambrick, of the River Road African-American Museum states, “This is all about us, and it’s not negative … We are the descendants of the survivors.”
Lippman Collection of Civil War Postal Covers
Postal covers are envelopes with printed designs commemorating an event, person, or cause. These postal covers were created during the Civil War in support of the Union, with one postal cover declaring support for the Confederacy. They include symbols and allegories for Union causes, Union slogans, images of Union heroes, and caricatures of Confederate leaders. They are an unusual resource for studying the popular culture and social history of the Civil War. These covers were collected by Alfred S. Lippman of Morgan City, Louisiana, who donated them to the Louisiana Research Collection in 2009. An attorney, Lippman has been active in civic and business affairs. Among his many contributions are his services on the boards of the Morgan City Harbor and Terminal District, 1967-2004 (President, 1972-1978-1999); Louisiana Board of Tax Appeals, 1980-1985; the Pan American Commission, 1990-1992; the Board of Supervisors, Louisiana Universities, 2000-2005; Whitney National Bank and Whitney Holding Corp., 1997- present; and the United States Coast Guard Foundation, 1990-2005. For more information please visit the LaRC website: http://larc.tulane.edu/ This project was made possible in part by the generous support of the Gail and Alfred S. Lippman Family Fund.
The Long Civil Rights Movement: Photographs from the Ronnie Moore Papers, 1964 -1972
This digital collection, funded by the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation, consists of photographs from the Ronnie Moore papers located at the Amistad Research Center. Moore is a civil rights activist and community development consultant who trained leaders in community organization, youth development, cultural diversity, and team building. Moore was the field secretary in the South for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the executive director of the Scholarship, Education and Defense Fund for Racial Equality, Inc. (SEDFRE). These photographs were collected by Moore in his roles with CORE and SEDFRE. The Ronnie Moore digital collection captures the political and social empowerment of African Americans in the South during the 1960s. Images of CORE activists, and the African American populations they served, are displayed in photographs of voter registration drives in Florida and South Carolina, freedom schools in Mississippi, and direct protest demonstrations in Louisiana and North Carolina. Images from Moore’s work with SEDFRE emphasize the economic activism carried out by African Americans during the late 1960s and 1970s in Northern states such as New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Indiana, and Maryland. Other economic initiatives depicted are farming cooperatives in Louisiana, job training for youth and adults in Mississippi, and the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign in Washington D.C. Most importantly, Moore’s photographs exhibit a shift in the Civil Rights Movement from direct protests targeting disenfranchisement and segregationist practices in the 1960s, to federally funded programs that were created to raise the economic viability of African Americans in the 1970s. Students, teachers, researchers, and others are encouraged to contact the Center about this digital collection and the Ronnie Moore papers. For more information, please visit the Center’s website at http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org/.
The Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Boeri Collection of Cuban-American Radionovelas, 1963-1970
From his office and studios on the fifth floor of “The Freedom Tower” in Miami, Italian-American Louis J. Boeri and his company, America's Productions, Inc.(API), formed a radio programming empire, selling their products to the United States government, to 200 radio stations in Latin America and Spain, and to Spanish-language radio stations in the United States during the latter half of the 1960s. With scripts penned by acclaimed Cuban scriptwriters in exile and Mexican writers as well, America’s Production Inc. produced two types of entertainment radio programming: one kind featuring political content, and a second kind, generally characterized as ‘pure entertainment.’ The entertainment programming was designed for both U.S. Latino and Latin American audiences and the content included radionovelas/dramas, comedies, advice programs, biblical dramas, mysteries, spy stories, and variety shows. The Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Boeri Collection of Cuban-American Radionovelas, 1963-1970 provides over 200 titles from API’s unique entertainment catalog contained in the collection of the same name held by the Latin American Library, the vast majority of which falls within the radionovela genre. The digitized recordings come from the master reel-to-reel audio tapes created by API for its entertainment library. Each title with its constituent episodes will now be available in digital audio format for the first time since they originally aired in the late 1960s. Along with the radionovelas recordings themselves, the collection includes images of some of API’s promotional materials that describe the process of creating a radionovela program and brief storyline descriptions, ephemera, and photographs of the actors, actresses, writers, and production staff of API. The digital version of the Louis J. Boeri and Minín Bujones Boeri Collection of Cuban-American Radionovelas affords a rare resource for the study of the history of the political, cultural, and commercial ties between the United States and Cuba via public broadcasting during a pivotal moment in the 2oth century. The collection offers new perspectives and insights into the use of media as political and cultural propaganda by Cuba and the United States during the Cold War era, as well as the history of popular culture and mass media in the wake of the 1959 Cuban Revolution among Spanish-speaking audiences in the United States and the Spanish-speaking countries to which the programs were exported. Descripción Desde su oficina y estudios en el quinto piso del "The Freedom Tower" en Miami, el empresario italoamericano Louis J. Boeri y su compañía, America's Productions, Inc. (API), formaron un imperio de programación de radio, vendiendo sus programas al gobierno estadounidense, a más de 200 emisoras de radio por toda América Latina y España, y a las emisoras de radio de habla hispana en los Estados Unidos durante la segunda mitad de los años sesenta. Con guiones escritos por aclamados guionistas cubanos exiliados y escritores mexicanos, America's Productions, Inc. producía dos tipos de programas: el primero de contenido político y el segundo, de carácter más general, se distinguía como "puro entretenimiento." Diseñado para un público latinoamericano y latino residente en EE.UU., el entretenimiento puro incluía radionovelas/dramas, comedias, programas de consejos y autoayuda, dramas bíblicos, misterios, historias de espías, y espectáculos de variedades. La Colección de Radionovelas Cubanoamericanas Louis J. Boeri y Minín Bujones Boeri, 1963-1970, ofrece más de 200 títulos de la programación de la API, contenidos en la colección del mismo nombre resguardada en la Biblioteca Latinoamericana. La gran mayoría de estos títulos pertenece al género de la radionovela. Las grabaciones digitalizadas provienen de las cintas de audio maestras creadas por la API para su biblioteca de programas de entretenimiento. Cada título con sus episodios constitutivos se encuentra disponible en formato de audio digital por primera vez desde su primera transmisión a finales de la década de 1960. Junto con las grabaciones de radionovelas, la colección digital incluye imágenes de algunos de los materiales promocionales de la API que describen el proceso de creación de un programa de radionovela así como breves reseñas, publicaciones efímeras y fotografías de actores, actrices, escritores y personal de producción de la API. La versión digital de la Colección Louis J. Boeri y Minín Bujones Boeri de radionovelas cubanoamericanas ofrece un recurso único para el estudio de la historia de los nexos políticos, culturales y comerciales entre Estados Unidos y Cuba a través de la radiodifusión pública durante de un momento crítico del siglo XX. La colección ofrece nuevas perspectivas e ideas sobre el uso de los medios de comunicación como propaganda política y cultural con respecto a Cuba por parte de Estados Unidos durante la Guerra Fría, así como la historia de la cultura popular y los medios de comunicación a partir de la Revolución Cubana de 1959 entre el público hispanohablante en los Estados Unidos así como en los demás países donde se exportaban estos programas.
Louisiana Menu and Restaurant Collection
The Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC) preserves extensive holdings documenting Louisiana's food and cooking culture, including several thousand menus, restaurant brochures, bar flyers, and other items essential for understanding the cuisine and food industry of our state. This online collection comprises three parts. Currently available are restaurant menus from the 1930s to the present. LaRC also preserves menus and brochures for hotel restaurants, as well as drink lists and promotional flyers for bars. Those extend to the 1910s and will go online during the summer and fall of 2012. Third, LaRC preserves banquet menus for organizations holding meetings and conventions. Extending back to the 1870s, we hope to put those online in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. While this online collection can be an invaluable service to researchers, we hope it will also spur a greater awareness of the importance of menus and restaurant brochures in documenting and preserving Louisiana foodways. This will therefore be an ongoing collection with new items added as we receive them. If you have a Louisiana menu or a menu collection, please contact us at larc@tulane.edu or 504-314-7833 so we can permanently preserve it and make it available to researchers from around the world. Note that LaRC's menu and food brochure collection is only one part of its extensive holdings about Louisiana's food heritage, including cookbooks, guidebooks, and publications of Louisiana food processors; publications and reports of food, dining, and agricultural trade organizations; and publications of food and wine clubs. The Louisiana Research Collection is a major research source for food professional organizations, clubs, and food service industries in Louisiana, preserving such serial titles as Dough Boy (Published in the Interest of the Southern Bakery Industry), Louisiana Grocer, and The Mixer, official organ of the Master Bakers' Association of New Orleans, as well as documents about Louisiana gourmand clubs, such as the Confrerie des chevaliers du Tastevin and the Ancient Order of Creole Gourmets. LaRC also preserves archival holdings pertaining to food and foodways in Louisiana, such as the Lafcadio Hearn papers (which include Creole recipes, proverbs and remedies loaned to Hearn by Dr. Rudolph Matas), the Jackson Brewing Company records, and the recipe books of noted sculptor Angela Gregory's mother and grandmother. To search our holdings and to learn more about how you can help preserve Louisiana's food heritage, please visit the LaRC website.
Louisiana Political Ephemera, 1860-1920
Ephemera are small printed items such as pamphlets and leaflets. These political flyers, brochures, and campaign cards concern both New Orleans local elections and Louisiana statewide elections. They preserve a wealth of information including names, parties, factions, offices, and dates of elections. They also often include information about a candidate’s family, religion, race, political beliefs, social activities, and businesses.
Louisiana Sheet Music
The Louisiana Sheet Music Collection is comprised of sheet music published in, or with topical relevance to, Louisiana (with an emphasis on New Orleans). Many important local composers are represented, including Basile Bares, Eugene Chassaignac, Edouard Dejan and Louis Moreau Gottschalk as well as several interesting, but lesser known, nineteenth-century composers. The collection covers 100 years in the history of local publishing (1838-1938) and represents a wide range of styles of popular and vernacular music, including Creole songs, nineteenth-century dance music, Confederate anthems, Mexican and Cuban danzas and danzon, ragtime, blues, and jazz .
M. O. Gershenzon Archive
Rare photos of Mikhail Osipovich Gershenzon's family and letters from Gershenzon. Gershenzon (1869-1925) was an important scholar and philosopher of Russia's Silver Age; a mystic, he believed in the power of the "cosmos" to bring unity to the world and happiness to the individual. These rare photos and letters describe the life of a Russian intellectual in the decade before and after the October Revolution.
Matas Library Memorabilia Collection
The Matas Library Memorabilia Collections consist of objects and collections with health science historical interest, especially associated with Tulane people and events. The Matas Library has a number of historical collections primarily involved with the history of medicine and public health in Louisiana. The collections include collections of signatures, medals, diplomas, scientific instruments, matriculation tickets, etc. Various memorabilia collections were originally part of the Rudolph Matas estate or donated by Tulane Alumni and their families. Collection examples are: Light collection of scientific letters - a collection of correspondence and memoranda with autographs of renowned scientists donated by David S. Light, M.D.; The Benjamin Bernard Weinstein medal collection - Weinstein medallions, medical and scientific medals and various matriculation tickets from the early days of the Medical College of Louisiana.
Mesoamerican Painted Manuscripts at the Latin American Library
The Latin American Library at Tulane University is home to one of the premier collections of original Mexican pictorial manuscripts found within the United States. These treasures, along with extensive holdings of rare books, other original manuscript collections, comprehensive holdings of facsimile editions of other codices, and other scholarly research materials and primary sources, distinguish it as one of the world’s foremost collections for the study of Mesoamerican writing systems and painted manuscripts, pre-Columbian culture, and early Colonial Mexican history and society. The digital collection, Mesoamerican Painted Manuscripts at the Latin American Library, presents images of the Library’s holdings of original and rare copies of Mexican manuscripts painted in the native pictorial tradition. They are painted on a variety of materials such as animal hide, maguey, amate or fig bark paper, linen, and European paper; their content dates to the early contact period (A.D. 1500 to 1700). The texts collected here represent a variety of themes: Aztec history and migrations, land claims and grants, property holdings, census data, fiscal and tribute accounts, and royal Mixtec genealogies. Descripción.... La Biblioteca Latinoamericana de Tulane alberga una de las colecciones de manuscritos pictográficos originales mexicanos más importantes de los Estados Unidos. Estos tesoros, aunados a una notable colección de impresos raros y curiosos, manuscritos coloniales originales, ediciones facsimilares de otros códices, y otras fuentes primarias y secundarias hacen de esta colección una de las más significativas del mundo para el estudio de los sistemas de escritura y los manuscritos pictóricos indígenas mesoamericanos, así como de las culturas precolombinas y el período colonial mexicano en general. La colección Manuscritos pictóricos mesoamericanos de la Biblioteca Latinoamericana ofrece imágenes digitales de los manuscritos originales y copias facsimilares raras de estilo pictográfico de los indígenas de México central. Los manuscritos se remontan a los siglos XVI y XVII, y están dibujados en diversas superficies, como piel de venado, papel de maguey, amate, e higo, tela de lino, y papel europeo. Está representada gran variedad de temas: la historia azteca y sus migraciones; pleitos y concesiones de tierras; disposición de propiedades; censos; cuentas fiscales y de tributo; y genealogías reales de familias mixtecas.
Mexican Incunabula (1559-1600) at the Latin American Library
The first printing press in the New World is established in Mexico City in 1539. Because printing was conceived by the Spaniards as a tool for missionaries in the Christianization of Indian populations, these early imprints consisted primarily of grammars and vocabularies of native Indian languages, as well as instructional religious tracts. Mexican Incunabula at the Latin American Library (1559-1600) provides digital copies in pdf format of some of the earliest products of Mexican printing presses (1539-1600). In addition to making available some of the earliest imprints produced in the New World, this collection provides important and rare sources for the study of the first phases of the Spanish enterprise in the New World, as well as initial forms of encounter between Native Americans and Europeans. These works also provide valuable insights into native languages and cultures during the first decades of contact. Early Mexican imprints are quite rare. Of the 220 identified titles, only 136 are known to reside in institutions around the world. The Latin American Library houses nine of these unique titles. The total number of pages is approximately 2,600. The texts are in Spanish, Purépecha and Nahuatl. The Mexican Incunabula at the Latin American Library (1559-1600) collection represents the Latin American Library’s contribution to a larger project called Impresos Mexicanos del Siglo XVI initiated by a small group of institutions in the United States and Mexico. The goal of the project is to create an on-line digital collection of early Mexican imprints that will include at least one copy of the existing 136 titles and as many additional versions of each as possible. The Primeros Libros de las Américas collection available at http://www.primeroslibros.org continues to grow as partner institutions join the project. Descripción En 1539, se estableció la primera imprenta del Nuevo Mundo en México. Dado que los españoles consideraban la imprenta como instrumento para la evangelización de los pueblos indígenas, estos primeros impresos consistían principalmente en gramáticas y vocabularios de idiomas nativos y tratados didácticos religiosos. La colección Mexican Incunabula at the Latin American Library (1559-1600)[Impresos Incunables Mexicanos (1559-1600) de la Biblioteca Latinoamericana] ofrece copias digitales en formato pdf de estos primeros productos de la imprenta mexicana (1539-1600). Además de hacer disponibles en forma digital algunos de los primeros impresos del Nuevo Mundo, esta colección representa una fuente indispensable para el estudio de la primera fase de la empresa española en el Nuevo Mundo. Estas obras ofrecen también valiosos aportes sobre los primeros contactos entre indígenas y europeos, y también sobre las culturas e idiomas indígenas en estas primeras décadas. Los incunables mexicanos son obras sumamente raras. De los 220 títulos identificados, se han identificado apenas 136 títulos en repositorios del mundo entero. Nueve de estos impresos se encuentran en el acervo de la Biblioteca Latinoamericana. En total, estos nueve incunables contienen aproximadamente 2.600 páginas. Los textos están en español, purépecha, y náhuatl. Esta colección también representa la contribución de la Biblioteca Latinoamericana al proyecto llamado Impreso Mexicanos del Siglo XVI que se realizó un grupo de siete instituciones en los Estados Unidos y México. El objetivo definitivo del proyecto es construir una colección digital accesible por Internet de los primeros impresos mexicanos, y que consistirá por lo menos un ejemplar de cada impresión única sobreviviente y las cuantas copias sea posible. Se encuentra la colección de Primeros Libros de las Américas con la url: http://www.primeroslibros.org.
New Orleans Independent Music Digital Collection
New Orleans is home to a rich and diverse musical culture, one where the independently released album speaks to and of the local culture as much as the commercially produced album. This project seeks to collect, preserve, and provide access to this rich heritage by creating a platform in the digital environment that allows visitors to learn not only about local indie bands but also about the individual artists and the web of relationships that underlie the local New Orleans musical culture.
Newcomb College Scrapbooks
Newcomb College long preserved some of the scrapbooks of its students in a vault on the historic women's campus. The scrapbooks today form one of the cornerstones to the Newcomb Archives and especially show the trajectories of lives in the period 1900-1945. The women sought to document diverse experiences. While no two albums are alike, the majority of the collection covers topics such as college athletics, plays and films, the city of New Orleans, social life, and academics. In addition, various albums such as that of Mary Jane Conover and Anne Crichton document travel while those of other scrapbook makers preserve memorabilia from summer camps, debutante parties, weddings, and political marches.
NOLA Hiphop and Bounce Archive
For more than three decades now, hiphop and bounce music traditions in New Orleans have been central outlets for creativity, celebration, social critique, community gathering, and political and expressive art in the city. From the groundbreaking, internationally recognized Cash Money and No Limit record labels to the strong currents of underground hiphop and street rap that sustain the tradition, New Orleans has been a recognized hiphop locale since the 1990s. Meanwhile, the indigenous New Orleans bounce music tradition, born at block parties, dance clubs, and other community gatherings, had until very recently been little heard outside the city. Since Hurricane Katrina, bounce has become a force of its own, gaining massive popularity and influence internationally via artists like Big Freedia, Katey Red and Nicky da B (1990-2014), though its roots go back well over two decades.
Print Culture of the Civil Rights Movement, 1950-1980
The Civil Rights Movement in the United States coincided with rapid changes in a variety of news and communications media. The expansion of television and documentary filmmaking brought images of the struggles of African Americans and those who supported civil rights into the homes of the American populace. However, control of the tone and content of electronic media was not always in the hands of those who were being documented. It was the democratization of various printed media that allowed civil rights leaders, workers, and organizations to circulate their combined, and sometimes contradictory, voices. This digital collection is an expansion of the exhibition The Revolution Will Not Be...: Print Culture of the Civil Rights Movement held at the Amistad Research Center in 2011. As the nation’s oldest, largest, and arguably most comprehensive independent archives/library documenting the modern Civil Rights Movement, the Amistad Research Center has brought together relevant documents from a variety of archival collections, including the papers of activists such as John O’Neal Papers, Fannie Lou Hamer Papers, Clarie Collins Harvey, Connie Harse, John Lee Tilley, as well as the Eric Steele Wells collection, the Center’s own ephemera collection, and other sources. This project highlights the newspapers, posters, broadsides, pamphlets, fliers, and other printed ephemera produced by student and community groups, leading civil rights organizations, and individuals, which documented a revolutionary era. Students, teachers, researchers, and others are encouraged to contact the Center about this digital collection and related materials on the Civil Rights Movement held at Amistad. For more information, please visit the Center’s website (http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org/)

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