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24th General Hospital in World War II
The 24th General Hospital, commonly known as the “Tulane Unit” was composed of personnel from the Tulane School of Medicine and was activated in July 1942. Colonel Walter C. Royals (Tulane SOM, 1917) was the commanding officer of the Unit. Thirty Tulane medical graduates and ten Tulane faculty members were included in the complement of forty-two medical doctors. The unit served: Fort Benning (July 15, 1942 to August 8, 1943); Bizerte, Tunisia (September 8, 1943 to May 31, 1944); Grosseto, Italy (July 21, 1944 to September 15, 1944); Army headquarters near Florence, Italy (September 21, 1944- ) and Livorno, Italy (June 1, 1945 to June 11, 1945). The 24th General Hospital Unit received the Fifth Army Plaque and Clasp for meritorious service with the Fifth Army. In the First World War Tulane also sponsored a medical unit organized by Dr. Rudolph Matas. S.Harvey Colvin. 24th General Hospital negative collection: Digitized negatives from the Colvin collection from the 24th General Hospital, World War II have been added to the digital collections of Tulane (funded by the History of Medicine Society). The collection includes 134 scanned (.tiff) negatives taken of the 24th General Hospital (United States. Army). The sites were visited by Colonel Samuel Harvey Colvin, Jr., M.D. The negatives were a gift of Melba Colvin, 1989. The Rudolph Matas Library of the Health Sciences has other collections related to the 24th General Hospital in WWII as part of the historic collections, such as the Col. Walter C. Royals, MD photo album and the memorabilia collections of Lt. Col. John J. Archinard, Claudia Weaver Archinard and Dr. Edward Des. Matthews.
American Missionary Association Photographs, 1887-1952
This digital collection, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, includes more than 3000 photographs of the activities of and related to the American Missionary Association from the late nineteenth century through the mid twentieth century. Photographers working with the American Missionary Association traveled through urban and rural communities within the continental United States of America, as well as to foreign lands, to visually record the environments and people who lived within them. The photographs document the experiences and lives of various ethnic groups of the world. They provide visual support to the textual documents of the American Missionary Association archives, housed at the Amistad Research Center.
Andrew Young Oral History Collection
The Andrew Young Oral History Collection encompasses 50 individual interviews conducted from 1980 to 1985 as part of writer and oral historian Tom Dent's research on his childhood friend, activist, congressman, and ambassador Andrew Young. As early as 1979, Dent was conducting research toward the autobiography of Young, though he wasn't officially hired as a consultant until 1981 to 1982 and continued to work on the book until 1986. Dent traveled to Atlanta, Georgia, to conduct a series of interviews with Young, then researched New Orleans and civil rights era history for the draft of the book, with the working title "An Easy Burden." The Young interviews provide a firsthand account of the events, leadership, and various campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement, as well as Young's childhood, work in the National Council of Churches, as a Congressman from Georgia, and United Nations Ambassador. The interviews provide numerous portraits of the SCLC leadership and civil rights workers including Hosea Williams, Ralph Abernathy, Wyatt Walker, Fannie Lou Hamer, Randolph Blackwell, Dorothy Cotton, Stan Levinson and of course Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The events and campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement are detailed for St. Augustine (Florida), Albany (Georgia), Selma (Alabama) and the Voting Rights Campaign, the Chicago Movement, and the Meredith March. Young provides detailed accounts of the FBI's harassment of Martin Luther King and SCLC staff, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis in 1968, and comments on what Young believes were the factors that produced the Civil Rights Movement of the sixties. Additional topics within the interviews include the Poor People's Campaign, the Vietnam Peace Movement, Young's Congressional Campaign and work as the UN Ambassador to Africa. Additional interviews within the oral history collection include interviews with Young's wife, Jean Childs Young, Dorothy Cotton, and Stoney Cooks.
The Architect's Eye
"The Architect's Eye" incorporates highlights from the Southeastern Architectural Archive, the largest repository of architectural records in the southern United States. Selected drawings illustrate nineteenth-century architecture as practiced by the Crescent City's leading designers, many of whom were educated in Europe. Building types include residences, commercial and institutional buildings. Selected drawings hint at the ways in which architectural drafting techniques separated the specialist from the layman. In an era of increasing professionalization, one's ability to render the third dimension on a two-dimensional surface elevated the socioeconomic level of one's clientele and the scale of one's commissioned projects. The collection represents some of the most accomplished architectural designs produced in nineteenth-century New Orleans.
Black Natchez
Black Natchez (1967) charts early attempts to organize and register Black voters and the formation of a self defense group in the Black community. In 1965, filmmaker Ed Pincus and David Neuman spent ten weeks in Natchez, Mississippi, filming the lives of ordinary people with unedited coverage of public and private civil rights organizational meetings, street demonstrations, and contests of power between young militants and the old guard, as well as secret meetings of African American self-defense organizations and interaction among the Black community. During this period, George Metcalfe, the recently elected president of the local branch of the NAACP, was bombed in his car leaving his job at the Armstong Tire Plant. In the week that followed, the African American community, along with local and national civil rights activists, gathered to address the problem. Pincus captured the fallout and general public sentiment following the event. The film is a genuine, often candid, portrayal of a community in a time of turmoil. At times, Pincus and his partner Neuman, turn the camera on an individual and interview him. Interviewees range from prominent civil rights leaders, including Charles Evers, to more representative residents, and they are asked to express their thoughts and feelings about racial tensions and violence in the city. The film also chronicles the tensions between the NAACP and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, both of which were operating in Natchez. Access to this film is restricted. Please contact the Amistad Research Center (http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org) to request permission.
Bourbon Street, 1944-1952
The Southeastern Architectural Archive, Tulane University Libraries, is home to the Walter Cook Keenan New Orleans Photographs Collection numbering over 3,000 images. Walter Cook Keenan (1881-1970), the first architect of the Vieux Carré Commission (VCC) and a lifelong member of the Audubon Park Commission, took the photographs in order to document changes to the built environment. In 2013, the Tulane Digital Library undertook to digitize the portion of the collection focused on historic Bourbon Street.
Carnival Collection
The online Carnival Collection currently features more than 5,500 original float and costume designs. Most are from Carnival’s “Golden Age” (the 1870s through the 1940s) with about three hundred designs from 1950 to 1970. The great majority of designs are from the Carnival krewes of Comus and Proteus, with Rex and Momus also represented. Included are artworks from many of Carnival’s most noted designers, including Jennie Wilde, Bror Anders Wikstrom, and Charles Briton. The Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC) preserves possibly the largest collection of New Orleans Carnival paper items. LaRC’s collection represents more than two hundred krewes and spans the founding of Carnival in New Orleans to the present. The LaRC Carnival Collection is available in the Schiro Reading Room. We will continually expand the online collection to include more contemporary designs along with invitations, dance cards, table cards, and other printed Carnival items. We depend on donations to keep our collection current. Please contact us if you have krewe invitations, dance cards, minutes, or other paper krewe materials, or if you would like to discuss how we can help you permanently preserve the records of your krewe. For more information please visit the LaRC website. Support for the LaRC Carnival Collection comes in part from the continuing generosity of Charles L. "Pie" Dufour (1903-1996), who bequeathed to the Louisiana Research Collection funds for preserving the contributions of Carnival to Louisiana's culture. Digitization of this collection was made possible by the generous support of the Office of the Provost, Tulane University.
Charity Hospital Reports
The history of Charity Hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana begins on May 10, 1736. On that date, the first Charity Hospital, funded by the estate of shipbuilder Jean Louis, opened in a house on Chartres and Bienville Streets in the historic French Quarter to serve the city's poor and indigent population. Since that time, Charity Hospital has moved from location to location around the city due to fire, flood, and politics. Charity Hospital's last location, the 1939 Art-Deco style complex located on Tulane Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana, has remained unused since Hurricane Katrina in August of 2005. The responsibility of Charity Hospital was assumed by the State of Louisiana on March 17, 1813, almost one year after Louisiana was granted statehood in 1812. Charity Hospital produced regular reports for the state government of Louisiana titled Report(s) of the Board of Administrators of the Charity Hospital to the General Assembly of Louisiana, also known as the Charity Hospital Reports. Published from 1842 to 1974, these reports are vital to Louisiana's social and medical history and include information not widely available from the nineteenth century. The Charity Hospital Reports include public health information on morbidity and mortality (including information on the yellow fever epidemics in New Orleans), venereal disease issues, disease incidence, vital statistics, and hospital administration. The reports also have information on the governance and financing of the hospital. Medical milestones and memorials are sometimes included. The reported information varies from year to year, but generally there is a report to the legislature with a statistical report of the diseases treated in the hospital. Names of administrators, physicians, surgeons, residents, interns, and donors to the hospital are included in most reports. Most of the Charity Hospital Reports were published in English, but some early reports were also published in French. The 1853 and 1856 Reports are the only years scanned in the French version. The Charity Hospital Reports Collection is a valuable historic tool for researchers with a wide range of interests from medical history to the importance of Charity Hospital as both a social and cultural institution in the New Orleans area. All of the reports were published as documents of the State of Louisiana and therefore are in the public domain. The John P. Isché Library at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans supplemented the Rudolph Matas Library content by providing replacement copies for scanning as needed to replace damaged or missing content. The documents are available as .pdf documents with the text fully searchable. Every attempt has been made to make these documents accessible according to guidelines and standards for Section 508. The Charity Hospital Reports have been digitized by the Rudolph Matas Library of the Health Sciences of Tulane University under a NLM grant awarded August 2010-June 2011 for a project titled: Early Medical Journalism of Louisiana, A pilot project for the preservation and sharing of Nineteenth Century Medical Publications of Louisiana [National Library of Medicine (NLM) Prime Contract No. N01-LM-6-3505; HHSN276200663505C]. See also the Matas Library website: Tulane and Charity Hospital: http://matas.tulane.edu/about/tulaneandcharity For more information on the history of Charity Hospital: Matas, Rudolph, and John Duffy. The Rudolph Matas History of Medicine in Louisiana. Baton Rouge: Published for the Rudolph Matas Trust Fund by Louisiana State University Press, 1958. Salvaggio, John E. New Orleans' Charity Hospital: A Story of Physicians, Politics, and Poverty. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1992.
Cole Coleman Photographs
The collection consists of gelatin silver prints made by New Orleans photographer Howard 'Cole' Coleman (1883-1969) and donated to Tulane University in memory of his wife, Thelma Hecht Coleman. Most images represent Coleman's professional work in Louisiana; a smaller number consists of copy-stand images taken from historic documents. Most predate his wife's death in August 1963.
The Crescent City Pictorial
In 1926, former school teacher and newspaper publisher O.C.W. (Orlando Capitola Ward) Taylor published a 28-page souvenir booklet dedicated "to the Progress of the Colored Citizens of New Orleans, Louisiana, "America's Most Interesting City." The Crescent City Pictorial was designed by O.T. Griffin and featured the photography of Villard Paddio. This largely visual publication featured images of African American homes, businesses, schools, churches, and social organizations, and serves as one of the best visual documents of African American life in early 20th century New Orleans. Businesses include the United Industrial Life Insurance Company, Carr and Llopis Undertakers, Dorsey's Valeteria, Flint-Goodridge Hospital, Geddes and Moss Undertaking and Embalming, George D. Geddes Co. Morticians, Astoria Hotel and Restaurant, as well as various pharmacies, photography studios, and mercantile companies. Social organizations, such as the San Jacinto Club, People's Community Center, Pythian Temple, Autocrat Social and Pleasure Club, and Lions Club are also featured, as well as various schools, including New Orleans College, Xavier University, Straight College, and elementary and secondary schools. For more information, please visit the Amistad Research Center's website: (http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org/).
Early Images of Latin America
"Early Images of Latin America" provides over 1,800 images from the Latin American Library’s Image Archive documenting people, places, landscapes, urban and rural scenes in various countries of the region from the mid-19th century to c. 1910. Images come from an array of sources, such as promotional albums compiled as travel souvenirs for tourists, studio portraits, personal photographic albums, glass lantern slides and stereoscopic images, as well as images captured by professional and amateur photographers. The geographic scope of the collection includes Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Peru, and Uruguay, with particular focus on the cities of Buenos Aires, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San José de Costa Rica, and Tegucigalpa. The collection features a variety of urban inhabitants and street scenes, waterfronts, botanical parks, and city architecture and landmarks. Rural views capture the production of coffee, bananas, tobacco, and sugar in haciendas and estancias, along with some portraits of local indigenous people, rural laborers, gauchos, and peasants. A selection from Panama highlights early phases of the construction of the Panama Canal and the daily life of people living and working along the Canal Zone. Included are several collections by some of the region's earliest and most prominent photographers such as Marc Ferrez, Courret y Hermanos, Abel Briquet, Sanfred Robinson, Antíoco Cruces y Luis Campa, Arturo W. Boote and Cía. among others. Descripción La colección “Early Images of Latin America” [“Primeras Imágenes de Latinoamérica”] ofrece un panorama documental fascinante de la vida moderna en las ciudades y sectores rurales de Latinoamérica desde mediados del siglo diecinueve hasta aproximadamente 1910. La colección cuenta con más de 1.800 imágenes del archivo fotográfico de la Biblioteca Latinoamérica de la Universidad de Tulane seleccionadas en torno a varias temáticas tales como transporte fluvial, marítimo y terrestre, turismo, producción agrícola, arte y arquitectura, industrialización, vida cotidiana en centros urbanos, jardines botánicos y parques, paisajes de la naturaleza, inmigración, y el canal de Panamá. Las imágenes provienen de una variedad de fuentes tales como álbumes de fotos comerciales de promoción, álbumes de familia y personales, retratos, placas de linterna e imágenes estereoscópicas. Las imágenes han sido tomadas por fotógrafos profesionales así como aficionados. Geográficamente, la colección abarca gran parte de la región. Aparecen representados Argentina, Brasil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, México, Panamá, Perú, y Uruguay, con enfoque especial en las ciudades de Buenos Aires, Habana, Lima, México D.F., Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San José de Costa Rica, y Tegucigalpa. Entre las imágenes se encuentran vistas de ciudades y de sus habitantes, escenas costeras y portuarias, así como vistas de parques, estructuras arquitectónicas, y monumentos. Los panoramas rurales captan escenas de la producción de varios alimentos tales como café, banano, azúcar, y tabaco en haciendas y estancias además de retratos de indígenas de varias regiones, labradores, gauchos, y agricultores. Se incluye también un grupo de imágenes que captan las fases iniciales de la construcción del Canal de Panamá y la vida cotidiana de las familias que vivían y trabajaban en la zona del canal. Entre los fotógrafos se destacan algunos de los pioneros y de mayor renombre en la región, tales como Marc Ferrez, Courret y Hermanos, Abel Briquet, Sanfred Robinson, Antíoco Cruces y Luis Campa, Arturo W. Boote and Cía., entre otros.
Essai D'Anatomie
1 v., 8 leaves of color mezzotint plates : col. ill. ; 53 cm. Bound and restored, William Kitchens, May 6, 2008.
French Colonial, Spanish Colonial, and Nineteenth-Century Louisiana Documents
Louisiana documents from 1655 to 1924 with a strong emphasis on the French colonial, Spanish colonial, and early national periods. Includes correspondence, land sales, slave sales, plantation journals, business licenses, property sales, professional and family papers, legal documents, land grants, tax receipts, theater programs, broadsides, engravings, and more. A noted Louisiana document collector, Felix Kuntz (1890-1971) donated his collection to Tulane University in four installments beginning in 1954 and requested that it be named after his parents. Today, the Rosemond E. and Emile Kuntz Collection (LaRC Manuscripts Collection 600) is a renowned resource for studying Louisiana with a special emphasis on New Orleans. Particularly noteworthy are records from the Company of the Indies, papers of Francisco Bouligny describing early French and Spanish authority over Louisiana, documents spanning Louisiana's entry into the United States through the Civil War and New Orleans? growth as a major commercial center, New Orleans municipal records (1805-1850s, including an 1805 census), and several small personal and family collections such as those of John McDonogh, the Pontalba family, and the Pierson family.
French-language folktales, Avoyelles Parish, 1944
This digital collection is comprised of audio recordings of seventy-nine folktales recorded by Calvin Claudel in Avoyelles Parish in the 1940s. All recordings are by persons who were natives of Avoyelles Parish and were bilingual in French and English. Claudel had a special interest in magic tales and numbskull tales (about the humorous misadventures of fools) and sought to demonstrate a connection between Louisiana and French folk traditions. According to Thomas Klingler, Associate Professor of French, the recordings “are a treasure trove for linguistic studies that give us a rare window onto Louisiana French from over 70 years ago.” Barry Jean Ancelet, folklorist and emeritus Granger & Debaillon Endowed Professor in Francophone Studies at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, said the collection is “an important one in the history of Louisiana French oral tradition studies.” A folklorist and professor of romance languages, Calvin Andre Claudel (1916-1988) was born in Avoyelles Parish. He completed his dissertation, “A Study of Louisiana French Folktales in Avoyelles Parish,” at the University of North Carolina in 1948. He used Presto recording equipment to record the interviews. Presto was an instantaneous recording technique using aluminum plates coated with a cellulose nitrate based lacquer. LaRC sent the plates to an audio conservator in Philadelphia who created the archival digital files that are now available online.
Giuseppe Ferrata Score Collection
Guiseppe Ferrata (1865-1928) was a respected concert pianist and composer in the United States. Prior to emigrating from Italy to the United States in 1892, Ferrata studied piano with Sgambati and Franz Liszt at the Accademia di S. Cecilia in Rome. After holding several teaching posts in the Northeast, Ferrata became the first teacher of piano and composition at the Tulane University Music Department (formerly the Sophie Newcomb College). He held this post until his death in 1982. As one of the founding faculty members, Ferrata’s influence on the early growth of the music department was substantial. During his career as an educator, Ferrata continued to compose music which won recognition at several competitions including the Music Teachers’ National Association Competition (1897), the Sonzogna Opera Competition of Milan (1903), and the Art Society of Pittsburgh Competition (1908). Though largely forgotten today, Ferrata’s works were generally well-received and performed across the United States. This collection includes more than 30 works published between 1901 and 1921. His versatility as a composer is highlighted by the variety of genres, from light songs, to solo piano works, masses, and string quartets. For more information about Guiseppe Ferrata, see: Baron, John H. 100 Years Newcomb-Tulane Music Department (1909-2009). New Orleans: John Baron, 2009. Eanes, Edward. “Ferrata, Giuseppe.” In Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/subscriber/article/grove/music/44655 (accessed May 23, 2012). Shipley, L.P. “Memoires and Music of Guiseppe Ferrata, a Pupil of Liszt.” In Journal of the American Liszt Society 28 (1990), 31-41.
Hogan Jazz Archive Photography Collection
The general graphics collection of the Hogan Jazz Archive contains approximately 6,000 images documenting people, places and events important to the study of New Orleans jazz. Included among the photographers whose work resides in the general graphics collection are Ernest Bellocq, Arthur P. Bedou, Villard Paddio, John Kuhlman, Don Perry, Florence Mars, William Russell, Alden Ashforth, Lee Friedlander, Bill Gottlieb, Ray Avery, Jack Hurley, Grauman Marks, Harriet Blum, Michael P. Smith, and many others.
Images from the Civil War and Reconstruction
The Louisiana Research Collection preserves a renowned collection of images pertaining to the Civil War and its aftermath. Among its holdings are more than 1,000 photographs, lithographs, and drawings from the Louisiana Historical Association depicting the Civil War and Reconstruction era. Subjects include political leaders, soldier and regimental portraits, studio portraits of general officers, photographs of memorial committees and veterans’ organizations, and forts and battlefields. Also included are images pertaining to the Army of Northern Virginia, the Washington Artillery, and photographs of Confederate monuments. Many of the images are unique, and many are by some of New Orleans’s more noted photographers.
Jambalaya and T-Wave Yearbooks
The Jambalaya yearbook began publication in 1896, but was not published from 1997-2003, nor in 2007. It ceased publication in 2009. Completely produced by students, these visual time-capsules document the daily life of students at Tulane University and the former Newcomb College, as well as highlighting special events which impacted their collegiate experience. Up until the early 1980s, students from all Tulane University schools and colleges were included in these yearbooks. In 1982, the students of the School of Medicine launched their own yearbook, the "T-Wave", which is also available digitally through the Tulane University Digital Library. All of the Tulane yearbooks are keyword-searchable and downloadable as PDF files.
James Freret Architectural Drawings
James Freret Architectural Drawings features 150 projects from the office of 19th century New Orleans architect James Freret. Freret (1838-1897) was born in New Orleans to a prominent family. His mother was Livie (DArensbourg) Freret, his father James P. Freret operated a cotton press. His uncle was William Freret who served as mayor of New Orleans (1840-1842; 1843-1844), and his cousin was William A. Freret, also a prominent New Orleans architect. William A. and James collaborated on the completion of the cast iron constructed Moresque Building, which was begun by William A. before the Civil War, and completed by the cousins afterwards. Before the Civil War, James trained in the office of New Orleans architect George Purves. In the early 1860s, he studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris under Charles-Auguste Questal. Following the outbreak of the war, he returned to Louisiana to take a commission as an officer in the Confederate Armys engineering corps. After being wounded in battle, he returned to New Orleans before the end of the war, to take up work as an architect. Freret designed many important institutional and commercial structures in New Orleans and Louisiana, but was most prolific as a residential architect. This online collection includes many of his most important works, including buildings for the Little Sisters of the Poor (1886), the Gothic Revival Masonic Hall (1867-1871), the Jewish Widows and Orphans Home (1868), and proposals for four different designs for the congregation of Temple Sinai (1870). Residential plans include projects for many wealthy leading citizens of the day, but also more modest homes, including Frerets own home. These presentation drawings are executed on small 19 x 13 sheets, in delicate watercolor. Most sheets include an exterior front elevation and floor plans for one project, but a few sheets have two projects. The Southeastern Architectural Archive also has representation of many other important 19th century New Orleans architects, including father and son James Gallier, Sr. and Jr., brothers Charles Bingley and James H. Dakin, Richard Esterbrook, John Turpin, Thomas Sully, and many others.
John Kennedy Toole Papers
LaRC Manuscripts Collection 740 consists of personal and literary papers of beloved New Orleans novelist, John Kennedy Toole (1937-1969), a posthumous winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. Much of the personal memorabilia of Toole’s life, and his parents’ lives, was originally preserved by the collection’s donor, Thelma Ducoing Toole, who was persistently intent on the publication of her son’s comedic masterpiece, A Confederacy of Dunces. Toole, born in New Orleans, excelled in all levels of his education, graduating Phi Beta Kappa with Honors in English at Tulane University at the age of twenty. He agonized as to whether to teach or to write, and attended graduate school at Columbia while teaching at Hunter College. His opportunity to spend time writing fiction came ironically while stationed with the Army in San Juan, Puerto Rico, while his job was teaching English as a second language. After returning to New Orleans, he met with disappointment attempting to publish A Confederacy of Dunces. He continued to struggle with his relationships, basic life choices and depression, again vascillating between attempting to teach and attempting to write, but sadly his life ultimately ended in suicide. Many years later, his ground-breaking novel was published by Louisiana State University Press, primarily through the efforts of his mother, who, with manuscript in hand, was fortunate to find a receptive audience in well-known novelist Walker Percy. The materials in the JKT Digital Collection are made available for research and study purposes only. Any other use requires permission. For further information on the permissions process and guidelines, see the permissions page of the Louisiana Research Collection http://larc.tulane.edu/services/publication-permission. The LaRC respects the intellectual property rights of others. The inclusion of materials in this digital collection is the result of either explicit permission from the copyright owner or a good faith belief, following reasonable investigation, that the work is in the public domain or available for purposes of research and scholarship under fair use principles of the copyright laws of the United States. If you believe that your copyrighted work has been improperly included in this digital collection, please notify the LaRC by contacting larc@tulane.edu.

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